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Title: Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer

Abstract

We demonstrate a magnetometer using polymer encapsulated whispering-gallery-mode microcavity actuated by a micro-magnet. The magnetic field induces force on the micro-magnet causing deformation in the polymer around the microcavity. Subsequently the microcavity detects the change in the refractive index of the polymer resulted from the deformation. This magnetometer works in the frequency range of hertz-to-kilohertz range and achieves a sensitivity of 880 pT/Hz 1/2 at 200 Hz in a micro-scale sensor volume. Polymer encapsulation of the magnetometer and fiber optical connection ensures environmental robustness and practicality of the sensor.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396126
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-22375
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; Atomic and Nuclear Physics

Citation Formats

Zhu, Jiangang, Zhao, Guangming, Savukov, Igor, and Yang, Lan. Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-08875-1.
Zhu, Jiangang, Zhao, Guangming, Savukov, Igor, & Yang, Lan. Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-08875-1.
Zhu, Jiangang, Zhao, Guangming, Savukov, Igor, and Yang, Lan. 2017. "Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-08875-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1396126.
@article{osti_1396126,
title = {Polymer encapsulated microcavity optomechanical magnetometer},
author = {Zhu, Jiangang and Zhao, Guangming and Savukov, Igor and Yang, Lan},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate a magnetometer using polymer encapsulated whispering-gallery-mode microcavity actuated by a micro-magnet. The magnetic field induces force on the micro-magnet causing deformation in the polymer around the microcavity. Subsequently the microcavity detects the change in the refractive index of the polymer resulted from the deformation. This magnetometer works in the frequency range of hertz-to-kilohertz range and achieves a sensitivity of 880 pT/Hz1/2 at 200 Hz in a micro-scale sensor volume. Polymer encapsulation of the magnetometer and fiber optical connection ensures environmental robustness and practicality of the sensor.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-08875-1},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
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