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Title: Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering

Abstract

The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of extracting the size of particles ejected from shocked metal surfaces (ejecta) from the angular distribution of light scattered by a cloud of such particles. The basis of the technique is the Mie theory of scattering, and implicit in this approach are the assumptions that the scattering particles are spherical and that single scattering conditions prevail. The meaning of this latter assumption, as far as experimental conditions are concerned, will become clear later. The solution to Maxwell’s equations for spherical particles illuminated by a plane electromagnetic wave was derived by Gustav Mie more than 100 years ago, but several modern treatises discuss this solution in great detail. The solution is a complicated series expansion of the scattered electric field, as well as the field within the particle, from which the total scattering and absorption cross sections as well as the angular distribution of scattered intensity can be calculated numerically. The detailed nature of the scattering is determined by the complex index of refraction of the particle material as well as the particle size parameter, x, which is the product of the wavenumber of the incident light and the particle radius,more » i.e. x = 2rπ= λ. Figure 1 shows the angular distribution of scattered light for different particle size parameters and two orthogonal incident light polarizations as calculated using the Mie solution. It is obvious that the scattering pattern is strongly dependent on the particle size parameter, becoming more forward-directed and less polarizationdependent as the particle size parameter increases. This trend forms the basis for the diagnostic design.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [3]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. National Security Tech, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. National Security Technologies, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Special Technologies Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396095
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-28776
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; Ejecta; Mie scattering

Citation Formats

Schauer, Martin Michael, Buttler, William Tillman, Frayer, Daniel K., Grover, Michael, Monfared, Shabnam Kalighi, Stevens, Gerald D., Stone, Benjamin J., and Turley, William Dale. Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1396095.
Schauer, Martin Michael, Buttler, William Tillman, Frayer, Daniel K., Grover, Michael, Monfared, Shabnam Kalighi, Stevens, Gerald D., Stone, Benjamin J., & Turley, William Dale. Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering. United States. doi:10.2172/1396095.
Schauer, Martin Michael, Buttler, William Tillman, Frayer, Daniel K., Grover, Michael, Monfared, Shabnam Kalighi, Stevens, Gerald D., Stone, Benjamin J., and Turley, William Dale. Wed . "Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering". United States. doi:10.2172/1396095. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1396095.
@article{osti_1396095,
title = {Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering},
author = {Schauer, Martin Michael and Buttler, William Tillman and Frayer, Daniel K. and Grover, Michael and Monfared, Shabnam Kalighi and Stevens, Gerald D. and Stone, Benjamin J. and Turley, William Dale},
abstractNote = {The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of extracting the size of particles ejected from shocked metal surfaces (ejecta) from the angular distribution of light scattered by a cloud of such particles. The basis of the technique is the Mie theory of scattering, and implicit in this approach are the assumptions that the scattering particles are spherical and that single scattering conditions prevail. The meaning of this latter assumption, as far as experimental conditions are concerned, will become clear later. The solution to Maxwell’s equations for spherical particles illuminated by a plane electromagnetic wave was derived by Gustav Mie more than 100 years ago, but several modern treatises discuss this solution in great detail. The solution is a complicated series expansion of the scattered electric field, as well as the field within the particle, from which the total scattering and absorption cross sections as well as the angular distribution of scattered intensity can be calculated numerically. The detailed nature of the scattering is determined by the complex index of refraction of the particle material as well as the particle size parameter, x, which is the product of the wavenumber of the incident light and the particle radius, i.e. x = 2rπ= λ. Figure 1 shows the angular distribution of scattered light for different particle size parameters and two orthogonal incident light polarizations as calculated using the Mie solution. It is obvious that the scattering pattern is strongly dependent on the particle size parameter, becoming more forward-directed and less polarizationdependent as the particle size parameter increases. This trend forms the basis for the diagnostic design.},
doi = {10.2172/1396095},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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