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Title: Cross-cutting High Surface Area Graphene-based Frameworks with Controlled Pore Structure/Dopants

Abstract

The goal of this project is to enhance the performance of graphene-based materials by manufacturing specific 3D architectures. The materials have global applications regarding fuel cell catalysts, gas adsorbents, supercapacitor/battery electrodes, ion (e.g., actinide) capture, gas separation, oil adsorption, and catalysis. This research focuses on hydrogen storage for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles with a potential transformational impact on hydrogen adsorbents that exhibit high gravimetric and volumetric density, a clean energy application sought by the Department of Energy. The development of an adsorbent material would enable broad commercial opportunities in hydrogen-fueled vehicles, promote new advanced nanomanufacturing scale-up, and open other opportunities at Savannah River National Laboratory to utilize a high surface area material that is robust, chemically stable, and radiation resistant.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1395966
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2017-00628
TRN: US1800069
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; HYDROGEN FUELS; HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS; GRAPHENE; HYDROGEN; PORE STRUCTURE; HYDROGEN STORAGE; VEHICLES

Citation Formats

Gaillard, J. Cross-cutting High Surface Area Graphene-based Frameworks with Controlled Pore Structure/Dopants. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1395966.
Gaillard, J. Cross-cutting High Surface Area Graphene-based Frameworks with Controlled Pore Structure/Dopants. United States. doi:10.2172/1395966.
Gaillard, J. 2017. "Cross-cutting High Surface Area Graphene-based Frameworks with Controlled Pore Structure/Dopants". United States. doi:10.2172/1395966. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1395966.
@article{osti_1395966,
title = {Cross-cutting High Surface Area Graphene-based Frameworks with Controlled Pore Structure/Dopants},
author = {Gaillard, J.},
abstractNote = {The goal of this project is to enhance the performance of graphene-based materials by manufacturing specific 3D architectures. The materials have global applications regarding fuel cell catalysts, gas adsorbents, supercapacitor/battery electrodes, ion (e.g., actinide) capture, gas separation, oil adsorption, and catalysis. This research focuses on hydrogen storage for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles with a potential transformational impact on hydrogen adsorbents that exhibit high gravimetric and volumetric density, a clean energy application sought by the Department of Energy. The development of an adsorbent material would enable broad commercial opportunities in hydrogen-fueled vehicles, promote new advanced nanomanufacturing scale-up, and open other opportunities at Savannah River National Laboratory to utilize a high surface area material that is robust, chemically stable, and radiation resistant.},
doi = {10.2172/1395966},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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