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Title: Approaches to Addressing Environmental Challenges with Wind Energy in the United States

Abstract

This presentation gives an overview of U.S. wind energy development's impacts on wildlife - particularly birds and bats. It includes discussion of mitigation efforts, research collaboratives, and U.S. Department of Energy funding.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1395934
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5000-69071
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; wind-wildlife interactions; mitigation efforts; research collaboratives; eagle; birds; bats; impact minimization

Citation Formats

Sinclair, Karin C. Approaches to Addressing Environmental Challenges with Wind Energy in the United States. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Sinclair, Karin C. Approaches to Addressing Environmental Challenges with Wind Energy in the United States. United States.
Sinclair, Karin C. Tue . "Approaches to Addressing Environmental Challenges with Wind Energy in the United States". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1395934.
@article{osti_1395934,
title = {Approaches to Addressing Environmental Challenges with Wind Energy in the United States},
author = {Sinclair, Karin C},
abstractNote = {This presentation gives an overview of U.S. wind energy development's impacts on wildlife - particularly birds and bats. It includes discussion of mitigation efforts, research collaboratives, and U.S. Department of Energy funding.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Sep 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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