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Title: Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M

Abstract

Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
13957
Report Number(s):
SAND99-2166
TRN: US0110845
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; CORROSION; DEPLETED URANIUM; DESERTS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; SOILS; SOURCE TERMS; URANIUM OXIDES; DISSOLUTION; GEOCHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

ANDERSON, HOWARD L., BACA, JULIANNE, KRUMHANSL, JAMES L., STOCKMAN, HARLAN W., and THOMPSON, MOLLIE E. Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/13957.
ANDERSON, HOWARD L., BACA, JULIANNE, KRUMHANSL, JAMES L., STOCKMAN, HARLAN W., & THOMPSON, MOLLIE E. Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M. United States. doi:10.2172/13957.
ANDERSON, HOWARD L., BACA, JULIANNE, KRUMHANSL, JAMES L., STOCKMAN, HARLAN W., and THOMPSON, MOLLIE E. Wed . "Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M". United States. doi:10.2172/13957. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/13957.
@article{osti_13957,
title = {Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M},
author = {ANDERSON, HOWARD L. and BACA, JULIANNE and KRUMHANSL, JAMES L. and STOCKMAN, HARLAN W. and THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.},
abstractNote = {Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.},
doi = {10.2172/13957},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}