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Title: H 2 Adsorbed Site-to-Site Electronic Delocalization within IRMOF-1: Understanding Non-Negligible Interactions at High Pressure

Abstract

Isoreticular metal organic frameworks (IRMOFs) have shown high uptake capabilities for storage of H 2 (11.5 wt % at 77 K and 170 bar). A significant literature has employed fragment models and a single adsorbed H 2 to identify adsorption sites within IRMOFs, as well as the necessary adsorbate–adsorbent interactions needed to reach sufficient adsorption enthalpy for practical usage, however at high pressures it remains to be seen if H 2···H 2 intermolecular interactions may influence the energetics. This study focuses upon IRMOF-1 (also known as MOF-5), and examines the individual H 2 stabilization energies at different sites using Möller–Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory alongside chemical models that consist of isolated fragment models and a cubic super cell cluster consisting of both the face- and edge-cube’s of IRMOF-1. Optimization of twenty stable configurations of singly adsorbed H 2 in the super-cell cluster is observed to be essential to obtain energy ordering of the five primary sites consistent with experiment and prior benchmark calculations (α >> β > γ > δ ≈ ε). To examine site-to-site interactions that may occur in the high-pressure regime, 64 co-adsorbed H2 within a super-cell cluster have been studied (a theoretical maximum of allmore » adsorption sites, 14 wt %). There, delocalization and/or charge transfer of electrons is observed from the σ orbitals of the H 2 bound at the γ positions into the σ* orbitals of H 2 bound at the α sites leads to stabilization of the interaction of H 2 at the γ, by 1.4 kJ/mol, respectively (using M06-2X/LANL2DZ). Furthermore, this effect has been confirmed to be charge transfer, and not a manifestation of enhanced dispersion at high loading, through natural bond order (NBO) analysis and by comparisons of the square of off-diagonal NBO Fock matrix elements for both density functionals that account for dispersion interactions and Hartree–Fock calculations that ignore dispersion.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1395569
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-12ER16362; SC0008688
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1996-1944
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; IRMOF-1; H2 adsorption; MOF-5; high-pressure interactions

Citation Formats

Wu, Jian, Kucukkal, Mustafa U., and Clark, Aurora E.. H2 Adsorbed Site-to-Site Electronic Delocalization within IRMOF-1: Understanding Non-Negligible Interactions at High Pressure. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3390/ma9070578.
Wu, Jian, Kucukkal, Mustafa U., & Clark, Aurora E.. H2 Adsorbed Site-to-Site Electronic Delocalization within IRMOF-1: Understanding Non-Negligible Interactions at High Pressure. United States. doi:10.3390/ma9070578.
Wu, Jian, Kucukkal, Mustafa U., and Clark, Aurora E.. Fri . "H2 Adsorbed Site-to-Site Electronic Delocalization within IRMOF-1: Understanding Non-Negligible Interactions at High Pressure". United States. doi:10.3390/ma9070578. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1395569.
@article{osti_1395569,
title = {H2 Adsorbed Site-to-Site Electronic Delocalization within IRMOF-1: Understanding Non-Negligible Interactions at High Pressure},
author = {Wu, Jian and Kucukkal, Mustafa U. and Clark, Aurora E.},
abstractNote = {Isoreticular metal organic frameworks (IRMOFs) have shown high uptake capabilities for storage of H2 (11.5 wt % at 77 K and 170 bar). A significant literature has employed fragment models and a single adsorbed H2 to identify adsorption sites within IRMOFs, as well as the necessary adsorbate–adsorbent interactions needed to reach sufficient adsorption enthalpy for practical usage, however at high pressures it remains to be seen if H2···H2 intermolecular interactions may influence the energetics. This study focuses upon IRMOF-1 (also known as MOF-5), and examines the individual H2 stabilization energies at different sites using Möller–Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory alongside chemical models that consist of isolated fragment models and a cubic super cell cluster consisting of both the face- and edge-cube’s of IRMOF-1. Optimization of twenty stable configurations of singly adsorbed H2 in the super-cell cluster is observed to be essential to obtain energy ordering of the five primary sites consistent with experiment and prior benchmark calculations (α >> β > γ > δ ≈ ε). To examine site-to-site interactions that may occur in the high-pressure regime, 64 co-adsorbed H2 within a super-cell cluster have been studied (a theoretical maximum of all adsorption sites, 14 wt %). There, delocalization and/or charge transfer of electrons is observed from the σ orbitals of the H2 bound at the γ positions into the σ* orbitals of H2 bound at the α sites leads to stabilization of the interaction of H2 at the γ, by 1.4 kJ/mol, respectively (using M06-2X/LANL2DZ). Furthermore, this effect has been confirmed to be charge transfer, and not a manifestation of enhanced dispersion at high loading, through natural bond order (NBO) analysis and by comparisons of the square of off-diagonal NBO Fock matrix elements for both density functionals that account for dispersion interactions and Hartree–Fock calculations that ignore dispersion.},
doi = {10.3390/ma9070578},
journal = {Materials},
number = 7,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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