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Title: Vehicle lightweighting energy use impacts in U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet

Abstract

In this article, we estimate the potential energy benefits of lightweighting the light-duty vehicle fleet from both vehicle manufacturing and use perspectives using plausible lightweight vehicle designs involving several alternative lightweight materials, low- and high-end estimates of vehicle manufacturing energy, conventional and alternative powertrains, and two different market penetration scenarios for alternative powertrain light-duty vehicles at the fleet level. Cumulative life cycle energy savings (through 2050) across the nine material scenarios based on the conventional powertrain in the U.S. vehicle fleet range from -29 to 94 billion GJ, with the greatest savings achieved by multi-material vehicles that select different lightweight materials to meet specific design purposes. Lightweighting alternative-powertrain vehicles could produce significant energy savings in the U.S. vehicle fleet, although their improved powertrain efficiencies lessen the energy savings opportunities for lightweighting. A maximum level of cumulative energy savings of lightweighting the U.S. light-duty vehicle through 2050 is estimated to be 66.1billion GJ under the conventional-vehicle dominated business-as-usual penetration scenario.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1395554
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sustainable Materials and Technologies; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Alternative Vehicle Powertrain; Life Cycle Energy; Lightweight Materials; Vehicle Fleet Energy; Vehicle Lightweighting

Citation Formats

Das, Sujit, Graziano, Diane, Upadhyayula, Venkata K. K., Masanet, Eric, Riddle, Matthew, and Cresko, Joe. Vehicle lightweighting energy use impacts in U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.susmat.2016.04.001.
Das, Sujit, Graziano, Diane, Upadhyayula, Venkata K. K., Masanet, Eric, Riddle, Matthew, & Cresko, Joe. Vehicle lightweighting energy use impacts in U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet. United States. doi:10.1016/j.susmat.2016.04.001.
Das, Sujit, Graziano, Diane, Upadhyayula, Venkata K. K., Masanet, Eric, Riddle, Matthew, and Cresko, Joe. Fri . "Vehicle lightweighting energy use impacts in U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet". United States. doi:10.1016/j.susmat.2016.04.001.
@article{osti_1395554,
title = {Vehicle lightweighting energy use impacts in U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet},
author = {Das, Sujit and Graziano, Diane and Upadhyayula, Venkata K. K. and Masanet, Eric and Riddle, Matthew and Cresko, Joe},
abstractNote = {In this article, we estimate the potential energy benefits of lightweighting the light-duty vehicle fleet from both vehicle manufacturing and use perspectives using plausible lightweight vehicle designs involving several alternative lightweight materials, low- and high-end estimates of vehicle manufacturing energy, conventional and alternative powertrains, and two different market penetration scenarios for alternative powertrain light-duty vehicles at the fleet level. Cumulative life cycle energy savings (through 2050) across the nine material scenarios based on the conventional powertrain in the U.S. vehicle fleet range from -29 to 94 billion GJ, with the greatest savings achieved by multi-material vehicles that select different lightweight materials to meet specific design purposes. Lightweighting alternative-powertrain vehicles could produce significant energy savings in the U.S. vehicle fleet, although their improved powertrain efficiencies lessen the energy savings opportunities for lightweighting. A maximum level of cumulative energy savings of lightweighting the U.S. light-duty vehicle through 2050 is estimated to be 66.1billion GJ under the conventional-vehicle dominated business-as-usual penetration scenario.},
doi = {10.1016/j.susmat.2016.04.001},
journal = {Sustainable Materials and Technologies},
number = C,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}