skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: ACME Priority Metrics (A-PRIME)

Abstract

A-PRIME, is a collection of scripts designed to provide Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) model developers and analysts with a variety of analysis of the model needed to determine if the model is producing the desired results, depending on the goals of the simulation. The software is csh scripts based at the top level to enable scientist to provide the input parameters. Within the scripts, the csh scripts calls code to perform the postprocessing of the raw data analysis and create plots for visual assessment.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [2];  [2];  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. University of California-Irvine
  2. Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS)
  3. Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division
  4. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
Katherine J. Evans, Charlie Zender, Luke Van Roekel, Marcia Branstetter, Mark Petersen, Milena Veneziani, Phillip Wolfram, Salil Mahajan, Susannah Burrows, and Xylar Asay-Davis
OSTI Identifier:
1395458
Report Number(s):
A-PRIME; 005451WKSTN00
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
005451
Software CPU:
WKSTN
Open Source:
Yes
Source Code Available:
Yes
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Evans, Katherine J, Zender, Charlie, Van Roekel, Luke, Branstetter, Marcia, Petersen, Mark, Veneziani, Milena, Wolfram, Phillip, Mahajan, Salil, Burrows, Susannah, and Asay-Davis, Xylar. ACME Priority Metrics (A-PRIME). Computer software. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1395458. Vers. 00. USDOE. 8 Jun. 2017. Web.
Evans, Katherine J, Zender, Charlie, Van Roekel, Luke, Branstetter, Marcia, Petersen, Mark, Veneziani, Milena, Wolfram, Phillip, Mahajan, Salil, Burrows, Susannah, & Asay-Davis, Xylar. (2017, June 8). ACME Priority Metrics (A-PRIME) (Version 00) [Computer software]. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1395458.
Evans, Katherine J, Zender, Charlie, Van Roekel, Luke, Branstetter, Marcia, Petersen, Mark, Veneziani, Milena, Wolfram, Phillip, Mahajan, Salil, Burrows, Susannah, and Asay-Davis, Xylar. ACME Priority Metrics (A-PRIME). Computer software. Version 00. June 8, 2017. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1395458.
@misc{osti_1395458,
title = {ACME Priority Metrics (A-PRIME), Version 00},
author = {Evans, Katherine J and Zender, Charlie and Van Roekel, Luke and Branstetter, Marcia and Petersen, Mark and Veneziani, Milena and Wolfram, Phillip and Mahajan, Salil and Burrows, Susannah and Asay-Davis, Xylar},
abstractNote = {A-PRIME, is a collection of scripts designed to provide Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) model developers and analysts with a variety of analysis of the model needed to determine if the model is producing the desired results, depending on the goals of the simulation. The software is csh scripts based at the top level to enable scientist to provide the input parameters. Within the scripts, the csh scripts calls code to perform the postprocessing of the raw data analysis and create plots for visual assessment.},
url = {https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1395458},
doi = {},
year = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
note =
}

Software:
To order this software, request consultation services, or receive further information, please fill out the following request.

Save / Share:
  • The overarching goal of this work is to advance the capabilities of technology evaluators in evaluating the building-level baseline modeling capabilities of Energy Management and Information System (EMIS) software. Through their customer engagement platforms and products, EMIS software products have the potential to produce whole-building energy savings through multiple strategies: building system operation improvements, equipment efficiency upgrades and replacements, and inducement of behavioral change among the occupants and operations personnel. Some offerings may also automate the quantification of whole-building energy savings, relative to a baseline period, using empirical models that relate energy consumption to key influencing parameters, such as ambientmore » weather conditions and building operation schedule. These automated baseline models can be used to streamline the whole-building measurement and verification (M&V) process, and therefore are of critical importance in the context of multi-measure whole-building focused utility efficiency programs. This report documents the findings of a study that was conducted to begin answering critical questions regarding quantification of savings at the whole-building level, and the use of automated and commercial software tools. To evaluate the modeling capabilities of EMIS software particular to the use case of whole-building savings estimation, four research questions were addressed: 1. What is a general methodology that can be used to evaluate baseline model performance, both in terms of a) overall robustness, and b) relative to other models? 2. How can that general methodology be applied to evaluate proprietary models that are embedded in commercial EMIS tools? How might one handle practical issues associated with data security, intellectual property, appropriate testing ‘blinds’, and large data sets? 3. How can buildings be pre-screened to identify those that are the most model-predictable, and therefore those whose savings can be calculated with least error? 4. What is the state of public domain models, that is, how well do they perform, and what are the associated implications for whole-building measurement and verification (M&V)? Additional project objectives that were addressed as part of this study include: (1) clarification of the use cases and conditions for baseline modeling performance metrics, benchmarks and evaluation criteria, (2) providing guidance for determining customer suitability for baseline modeling, (3) describing the portfolio level effects of baseline model estimation errors, (4) informing PG&E’s development of EMIS technology product specifications, and (5) providing the analytical foundation for future studies about baseline modeling and saving effects of EMIS technologies. A final objective of this project was to demonstrate the application of the methodology, performance metrics, and test protocols with participating EMIS product vendors.« less
  • No matter what your profession, most busy days require that you juggle priorities -- especially when an unexpected occurrence changes your plans. In spite of such priority juggling, relatively few people use computers to help them to decide on which job to do next. Such lack of this computer application is of no surprise. Consider that the human brain has a 100 billion-cell capacity. Each neuron of the brain is capable of receiving 100,000 or more signals. It is easy to understand, then, why such a powerful organizing and memory system is so apt with notebook, yellow stickies, or padmore » and pencil. But if you are responsible for the status or progress of as many as 25 to 200 or more jobs on a given day, then a computer with outliner software could be one of your most useful tools. Some trees in the work-jungle change overnight. Outliner software can help you to keep track of such changes that beget changes, seemingly without end. 14 figs.« less
  • We report on a facility login software, whose objective is to improve safety in multi-user research facilities. Its most important safety features are: 1) blocks users from entering the lab after being absent for more than a predetermined number of days; 2) gives users a random safety quiz question, which they need to answer satisfactorily in order to use the facility; 3) blocks unauthorized users from using the facility afterhours; and 4) displays the current users in the facility. Besides restricting access to unauthorized users, the software keeps users mindful of key safety concepts. In addition, integration of the softwaremore » with a door controller system can convert it into an effective physical safety mechanism. Depending on DOE approval, the code may be available as open source.« less
  • Managers of software maintenance functions know that maintenance costs often increase with the age of software, and that maintenance costs are frequently proportional to software complexity. When the service to expense ratio degrades, sometimes a rewrite of the software results in a payoff. This research is a case study, presenting factors which contributed to the expense of one maintenance function. A descriptive model was used. It is suggested how the descriptive model could be a building block toward the derivation of a predictive model. A predictive model could be used in the preparation of a breakeven/payoff analysis, justifying the expensemore » of rewriting existing software to contain minimum complexity by incorporating modern techniques.« less
  • The purpose of this review of software metrics is to examine the quality of the metrics gathered in the 2010 IV&V and to set an outline for results of updated metrics runs to be performed. We find from the review that the maintenance of accepted quality standards presented in the SAPHIRE 8 initial Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of April, 2010 is most easily achieved by continuing to utilize the tools used in that effort while adding a metric of bug tracking and resolution. Recommendations from the final IV&V were to continue periodic measurable metrics such as McCabe's complexity measuremore » to ensure quality is maintained. The four software tools used to measure quality in the IV&V were CodeHealer, Coverage Validator, Memory Validator, Performance Validator, and Thread Validator. These are evaluated based on their capabilities. We attempted to run their latest revisions with the newer Delphi 2010 based SAPHIRE 8 code that has been developed and was successful with all of the Validator series of tools on small tests. Another recommendation from the IV&V was to incorporate a bug tracking and resolution metric. To improve our capability of producing this metric, we integrated our current web reporting system with the SpiraTest test management software purchased earlier this year to track requirements traceability.« less

To initiate an order for this software, request consultation services, or receive further information, fill out the request form below. You may also reach us by email at: .

OSTI staff will begin to process an order for scientific and technical software once the payment and signed site license agreement are received. If the forms are not in order, OSTI will contact you. No further action will be taken until all required information and/or payment is received. Orders are usually processed within three to five business days.

Software Request

(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)