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Title: Interannual Variation in Hydrologic Budgets in an Amazonian Watershed with a Coupled Subsurface–Land Surface Process Model

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3]
  1. Institute of Groundwater and Earth Science, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China, and Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, and Earth Research Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California
  2. Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania
  3. Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California
  4. Earth Research Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1395202
Grant/Contract Number:
0010620
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Hydrometeorology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-27 18:41:50; Journal ID: ISSN 1525-755X
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Niu, Jie, Shen, Chaopeng, Chambers, Jeffrey Q., Melack, John M., and Riley, William J. Interannual Variation in Hydrologic Budgets in an Amazonian Watershed with a Coupled Subsurface–Land Surface Process Model. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/JHM-D-17-0108.1.
Niu, Jie, Shen, Chaopeng, Chambers, Jeffrey Q., Melack, John M., & Riley, William J. Interannual Variation in Hydrologic Budgets in an Amazonian Watershed with a Coupled Subsurface–Land Surface Process Model. United States. doi:10.1175/JHM-D-17-0108.1.
Niu, Jie, Shen, Chaopeng, Chambers, Jeffrey Q., Melack, John M., and Riley, William J. 2017. "Interannual Variation in Hydrologic Budgets in an Amazonian Watershed with a Coupled Subsurface–Land Surface Process Model". United States. doi:10.1175/JHM-D-17-0108.1.
@article{osti_1395202,
title = {Interannual Variation in Hydrologic Budgets in an Amazonian Watershed with a Coupled Subsurface–Land Surface Process Model},
author = {Niu, Jie and Shen, Chaopeng and Chambers, Jeffrey Q. and Melack, John M. and Riley, William J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1175/JHM-D-17-0108.1},
journal = {Journal of Hydrometeorology},
number = 9,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 27, 2018
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  • A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively-parallel multi-physics reactive transport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model, named PFLOTRAN_CLM v1.0, is applied to a 400 m × 400 m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells along the Columbia River shoreline. PFLOTRAN_CLM v1.0 simulations are performed at three spatial resolutions over a five-year period to evaluate the impact of hydro-climatic conditionsmore » and spatial resolution on simulated variables. Results show that the coupled model is capable of simulating groundwater-river water interactions driven by river stage variability along managed river reaches, which are of global significance as a result of over 30,000 dams constructed worldwide during the past half century. Our numerical experiments suggest that the land-surface energy partitioning is strongly modulated by groundwater-river water interactions through expanding the periodically inundated fraction of the riparian zone, and enhancing moisture availability in the vadose zone via capillary rise in response to the river stage change. Furthermore, spatial resolution is found to impact significantly the accuracy of estimated the mass exchange rates at the boundaries of the aquifer, and it becomes critical when surface and subsurface become more tightly coupled with groundwater table within six to seven meters below the surface. Inclusion of lateral subsurface flow impacted both the surface energy budget and subsurface transport processes. The coupled model developed in this study can be used for improving mechanistic understanding of ecosystem functioning, biogeochemical cycling, and land-atmosphere interactions along river corridors under historical and future hydro-climatic changes. As a result, the dataset presented in this study can also serve as a good benchmarking case for testing other integrated models.« less
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  • A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively parallel multiphysics reactive transport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model, named CP v1.0, is applied to a 400 m × 400 m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells along the Columbia River shoreline. CP v1.0 simulations are performed at three spatial resolutions (i.e., 2, 10, and 20 m) over a 5-year period to evaluate themore » impact of hydroclimatic conditions and spatial resolution on simulated variables. Results show that the coupled model is capable of simulating groundwater–river-water interactions driven by river stage variability along managed river reaches, which are of global significance as a result of over 30 000 dams constructed worldwide during the past half-century. Our numerical experiments suggest that the land-surface energy partitioning is strongly modulated by groundwater–river-water interactions through expanding the periodically inundated fraction of the riparian zone, and enhancing moisture availability in the vadose zone via capillary rise in response to the river stage change. Meanwhile, CLM4.5 fails to capture the key hydrologic process (i.e., groundwater–river-water exchange) at the site, and consequently simulates drastically different water and energy budgets. Furthermore, spatial resolution is found to significantly impact the accuracy of estimated the mass exchange rates at the boundaries of the aquifer, and it becomes critical when surface and subsurface become more tightly coupled with groundwater table within 6 to 7 meters below the surface. Inclusion of lateral subsurface flow influenced both the surface energy budget and subsurface transport processes as a result of river-water intrusion into the subsurface in response to an elevated river stage that increased soil moisture for evapotranspiration and suppressed available energy for sensible heat in the warm season. The coupled model developed in this study can be used for improving mechanistic understanding of ecosystem functioning and biogeochemical cycling along river corridors under historical and future hydroclimatic changes. The dataset presented in this study can also serve as a good benchmarking case for testing other integrated models.« less
  • © 2017 Author(s). A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively parallel multiphysics reactive transport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model, named CP v1.0, is applied to a 400 m × 400 m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells along the Columbia River shoreline. CP v1.0 simulations are performed at three spatial resolutions (i.e., 2, 10, and 20 m) overmore » a 5-year period to evaluate the impact of hydroclimatic conditions and spatial resolution on simulated variables. Results show that the coupled model is capable of simulating groundwater-river-water interactions driven by river stage variability along managed river reaches, which are of global significance as a result of over 30 000 dams constructed worldwide during the past half-century. Our numerical experiments suggest that the land-surface energy partitioning is strongly modulated by groundwater-river-water interactions through expanding the periodically inundated fraction of the riparian zone, and enhancing moisture availability in the vadose zone via capillary rise in response to the river stage change. Meanwhile, CLM4.5 fails to capture the key hydrologic process (i.e., groundwater-river-water exchange) at the site, and consequently simulates drastically different water and energy budgets. Furthermore, spatial resolution is found to significantly impact the accuracy of estimated the mass exchange rates at the boundaries of the aquifer, and it becomes critical when surface and subsurface become more tightly coupled with groundwater table within 6 to 7 meters below the surface. Inclusion of lateral subsurface flow influenced both the surface energy budget and subsurface transport processes as a result of river-water intrusion into the subsurface in response to an elevated river stage that increased soil moisture for evapotranspiration and suppressed available energy for sensible heat in the warm season. The coupled model developed in this study can be used for improving mechanistic understanding of ecosystem functioning and biogeochemical cycling along river corridors under historical and future hydroclimatic changes. The dataset presented in this study can also serve as a good benchmarking case for testing other integrated models.« less
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