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Title: In-line monitoring of Li-ion battery electrode porosity and areal loading using active thermal scanning - modeling and initial experiment

Abstract

This work focuses on a new technique called active thermal scanning for in-line monitoring of porosity and areal loading of Li-ion battery electrodes. In this technique a moving battery electrode is subjected to thermal excitation and the induced temperature rise is monitored using an infra-red camera. Static and dynamic experiments with speeds up to 1.5 m min -1 are performed on both cathodes and anodes and a combined micro- and macro-scale finite element thermal model of the system is developed. It is shown experimentally and through simulations that during thermal scanning the temperature profile generated in an electrode depends on both coating porosity (or area loading) and thickness. Here, it is concluded that by inverting this relation the porosity (or areal loading) can be determined, if thermal response and thickness are simultaneously measured.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1395099
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5900-67996
Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7753
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Power Sources
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 375; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7753
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; porosity monitoring; areal loading monitoring; thermal scanning; battery electrodes; infrared thermography; roll-to-roll fabrication

Citation Formats

Rupnowski, Przemyslaw, Ulsh, Michael J., Sopori, Bhushan, Green, Brian G., Wood, III, David L., Li, Jianlin, and Sheng, Yangping. In-line monitoring of Li-ion battery electrode porosity and areal loading using active thermal scanning - modeling and initial experiment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.07.084.
Rupnowski, Przemyslaw, Ulsh, Michael J., Sopori, Bhushan, Green, Brian G., Wood, III, David L., Li, Jianlin, & Sheng, Yangping. In-line monitoring of Li-ion battery electrode porosity and areal loading using active thermal scanning - modeling and initial experiment. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.07.084.
Rupnowski, Przemyslaw, Ulsh, Michael J., Sopori, Bhushan, Green, Brian G., Wood, III, David L., Li, Jianlin, and Sheng, Yangping. 2017. "In-line monitoring of Li-ion battery electrode porosity and areal loading using active thermal scanning - modeling and initial experiment". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.07.084.
@article{osti_1395099,
title = {In-line monitoring of Li-ion battery electrode porosity and areal loading using active thermal scanning - modeling and initial experiment},
author = {Rupnowski, Przemyslaw and Ulsh, Michael J. and Sopori, Bhushan and Green, Brian G. and Wood, III, David L. and Li, Jianlin and Sheng, Yangping},
abstractNote = {This work focuses on a new technique called active thermal scanning for in-line monitoring of porosity and areal loading of Li-ion battery electrodes. In this technique a moving battery electrode is subjected to thermal excitation and the induced temperature rise is monitored using an infra-red camera. Static and dynamic experiments with speeds up to 1.5 m min-1 are performed on both cathodes and anodes and a combined micro- and macro-scale finite element thermal model of the system is developed. It is shown experimentally and through simulations that during thermal scanning the temperature profile generated in an electrode depends on both coating porosity (or area loading) and thickness. Here, it is concluded that by inverting this relation the porosity (or areal loading) can be determined, if thermal response and thickness are simultaneously measured.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.07.084},
journal = {Journal of Power Sources},
number = ,
volume = 375,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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