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Title: Progress Towards an Indirect Neutron Capture Capability at LANSCE

Abstract

There are many neutron-capture cross sections of importance to radiochemical diagnostics and nuclear forensics which are beyond the reach of direct measurements. Hence, we have been developing an apparatus on flight path (FP) 13 at target 1 at LANSCE for tightly constraining these cross sections via determination of the underlying physical quantities. FP-13 was initially a cold-neutron beam line for materials science and therefore required substantial modification for use for nuclear physics. In FY17, we made several improvements to FP-13, demonstrated improved performance due to these changes via measurements on a variety of samples, identified a few more needed improvements, and reconfigured the beam line to implement the most important of these. New measurements to assess the impact of the most recent improvement will commence when beam is restored to LANSCE. Although FP-13 has not yet reached the performance required for small radioactive samples, measurements on a gold sample have led to an important science result which we are preparing for publication.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1394944
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-28521
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Koehler, Paul E., Ullmann, John Leonard, Couture, Aaron Joseph, and Mosby, Shea Morgan. Progress Towards an Indirect Neutron Capture Capability at LANSCE. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1394944.
Koehler, Paul E., Ullmann, John Leonard, Couture, Aaron Joseph, & Mosby, Shea Morgan. Progress Towards an Indirect Neutron Capture Capability at LANSCE. United States. doi:10.2172/1394944.
Koehler, Paul E., Ullmann, John Leonard, Couture, Aaron Joseph, and Mosby, Shea Morgan. 2017. "Progress Towards an Indirect Neutron Capture Capability at LANSCE". United States. doi:10.2172/1394944. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394944.
@article{osti_1394944,
title = {Progress Towards an Indirect Neutron Capture Capability at LANSCE},
author = {Koehler, Paul E. and Ullmann, John Leonard and Couture, Aaron Joseph and Mosby, Shea Morgan},
abstractNote = {There are many neutron-capture cross sections of importance to radiochemical diagnostics and nuclear forensics which are beyond the reach of direct measurements. Hence, we have been developing an apparatus on flight path (FP) 13 at target 1 at LANSCE for tightly constraining these cross sections via determination of the underlying physical quantities. FP-13 was initially a cold-neutron beam line for materials science and therefore required substantial modification for use for nuclear physics. In FY17, we made several improvements to FP-13, demonstrated improved performance due to these changes via measurements on a variety of samples, identified a few more needed improvements, and reconfigured the beam line to implement the most important of these. New measurements to assess the impact of the most recent improvement will commence when beam is restored to LANSCE. Although FP-13 has not yet reached the performance required for small radioactive samples, measurements on a gold sample have led to an important science result which we are preparing for publication.},
doi = {10.2172/1394944},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protonsmore » of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.« less
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  • This report briefly discusses experiments conducted at the Lansce neutron source facility. The experiments were conducted on the following instruments: high intensity powder diffractometer; neutron powder diffractometer; single crystal diffractometer; low-q diffractometer; surface profile analysis reflectometer; filter difference spectrometer; experiment reports, and pharos.
  • This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and anmore » associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.« less
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