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Title: Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Temperature Anomalies Based on Global Radiosonde Network Data (1958 - 2005)

Abstract

The observed radiosonde data from the Comprehensive Aerological Reference Data Set (CARDS) (Eskridge et al. 1995) were taken as the primary input for obtaining the series. These data were for the global radiosonde observational network through 2001. Since 2002, the AEROSTAB data (uper-air observations obtained through communication channels), collected at RIHMI-WDC in Obninsk, have been used. Both of these data sources were for the global radiosonde observational network. The CARDS data set is known as the most complete collection of radiosonde data.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Russian Research Institute for Hydrometeorological Information--World Data Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1394911
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Numeric Data
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Sterin, Alexander M. Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Temperature Anomalies Based on Global Radiosonde Network Data (1958 - 2005). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/cli.004.
Sterin, Alexander M. Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Temperature Anomalies Based on Global Radiosonde Network Data (1958 - 2005). United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/cli.004.
Sterin, Alexander M. Mon . "Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Temperature Anomalies Based on Global Radiosonde Network Data (1958 - 2005)". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/cli.004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394911.
@article{osti_1394911,
title = {Tropospheric and Lower Stratospheric Temperature Anomalies Based on Global Radiosonde Network Data (1958 - 2005)},
author = {Sterin, Alexander M.},
abstractNote = {The observed radiosonde data from the Comprehensive Aerological Reference Data Set (CARDS) (Eskridge et al. 1995) were taken as the primary input for obtaining the series. These data were for the global radiosonde observational network through 2001. Since 2002, the AEROSTAB data (uper-air observations obtained through communication channels), collected at RIHMI-WDC in Obninsk, have been used. Both of these data sources were for the global radiosonde observational network. The CARDS data set is known as the most complete collection of radiosonde data.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/cli.004},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Dataset:

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