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Title: Timescales of Energy Storage Needed for Reducing Renewable Energy Curtailment

Abstract

This report analyzes the storage duration required to reduce VG curtailment under high-VG scenarios. It also examines the value of storage with varying durations.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1394739
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-68960
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; storage duration; VG; VG curtailment; high VG; value of storage

Citation Formats

Denholm, Paul L., and Mai, Trieu T. Timescales of Energy Storage Needed for Reducing Renewable Energy Curtailment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1394739.
Denholm, Paul L., & Mai, Trieu T. Timescales of Energy Storage Needed for Reducing Renewable Energy Curtailment. United States. doi:10.2172/1394739.
Denholm, Paul L., and Mai, Trieu T. 2017. "Timescales of Energy Storage Needed for Reducing Renewable Energy Curtailment". United States. doi:10.2172/1394739. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394739.
@article{osti_1394739,
title = {Timescales of Energy Storage Needed for Reducing Renewable Energy Curtailment},
author = {Denholm, Paul L. and Mai, Trieu T.},
abstractNote = {This report analyzes the storage duration required to reduce VG curtailment under high-VG scenarios. It also examines the value of storage with varying durations.},
doi = {10.2172/1394739},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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