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Title: Preparation of a Guide for Design and Analysis of Bolted Closures.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1394721
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-9198C
647480
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the PATRAM 2016 held September 18-23, 2016 in Kobe, Japan.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ammerman, Douglas J., Sanborn, Scott Edward, and Bignell, John. Preparation of a Guide for Design and Analysis of Bolted Closures.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Ammerman, Douglas J., Sanborn, Scott Edward, & Bignell, John. Preparation of a Guide for Design and Analysis of Bolted Closures.. United States.
Ammerman, Douglas J., Sanborn, Scott Edward, and Bignell, John. 2016. "Preparation of a Guide for Design and Analysis of Bolted Closures.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394721.
@article{osti_1394721,
title = {Preparation of a Guide for Design and Analysis of Bolted Closures.},
author = {Ammerman, Douglas J. and Sanborn, Scott Edward and Bignell, John},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • This volume has been prepared under the sponsorship of the Operations, Applications, and Components (OAC) Committee of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping division. The OAC Committee promotes the development and exchange of information in several areas of interest to the pressure vessels and piping industry, including reliability, qualification, testing, operations, hazardous substance transport and storage, valves, pumps, piping, pipe and duct supports, service life assessment, and related pressure-retaining and structural components. This publication consolidates technical papers on recent developments and findings in four highly specialized areas of pressure vessels and piping technology: power plant equipment design; bolted joints; pumpsmore » and valves; and pipe and duct supports. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.« less
  • Bolted flanged connections for fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) pipes and pressure vessels are of great importance for any user of FRP material in fluid containment applications. At present, no dimensional standards or design rules exist for FRP flanges. Most often, flanges are fabricated to dimensional standards for metallic flanges without questioning their applicability to FRP materials. This paper discusses simplified and exact design methods for composite flanges, based on isotropic material design and on laminate theory design. Both, exact and simplified methods are included. Results of various design methods are then compared with experimental results from strain gage measurements onmore » test pressure vessels. Methods of flange fabrication such as hand lay-up, injection molding, filament winding, and others, are discussed for their relative merits in pressure vessel and piping applications. Both, integral and bonded flanges are covered as applicable to the various methods of fabrication, also the economic implications of these methods. Also treated are the problems of gasket selection, bolting and overbolting, gasket stresses, and leakage of flanged connections.« less
  • Finite-element techniques were used to determine the combination of parameters that would produce the optimum design for the bolted joint. A finite-element model was constructed from a combination of two-dimensional isoparametric axisymmetric solid elements and gap elements. The gap elements represented the physical contact between the plate and bolt head and the plate and nut. The model was used to determine the stress patterns, displacements, and contact areas (separation diameters) across the bolted joint. Computed results for the contact area showed the following: the contact area is determined by joint design, not bolt Toad magnitude; joint thickness, plate thickness ratio,more » and bolt-head dimensions have a pronounced effect on the contact area; and the maximum contact area occurs with plates of equal thickness. The change in separation diameters (D) can be presented in a simple straight-line expression D/d = 1 + 1.1 (L/d), where L = joint thickness and d = bolt diameter. The stress results indicated that neither load nor stress distribution under the bolt head or nut is constant or uniform. Bolt-head dimensions, joint thickness, and plate thickness ratio markedly affect the developed stresses, with the maximum stress value occurring at the bolt-plate interface. Beyond the bolt head, maximum stress develops at the interface plane of the bolted plates, with that stress decreasing as the plate thickness ratio increases reaching its lowest value at the equal-thickness ratio. These results indicate that design stiffness formulas used heretofore are not adequate. Results provided by this analysis should prove more effective in achieving optimum bolt design for bolted joints.« less
  • Finite-element techniques were used to determine the combination of parameters that would produce the optimum design for the bolted joint. A finite-element model was constructed from a combination of two-dimensional isoparametric axisymmetric solid elements and gap elements. The gap elements represented the physical contact between the plate and bolt head and the plate and nut. The model was used to determine the stress patterns, displacements, and contact areas (separation diameters) across the bolted joint. Computed results for the contact area showed the following: the contact area is determined by joint design, not bolt Toad magnitude; joint thickness, plate thickness ratio,more » and bolt-head dimensions have a pronounced effect on the contact area; and the maximum contact area occurs with plates of equal thickness. The change in separation diameters (D) can be presented in a simple straight-line expression D/d = 1 + 1.1 (L/d), where L = joint thickness and d = bolt diameter. The stress results indicated that neither load nor stress distribution under the bolt head or nut is constant or uniform. Bolt-head dimensions, joint thickness, and plate thickness ratio markedly affect the developed stresses, with the maximum stress value occurring at the bolt-plate interface. Beyond the bolt head, maximum stress develops at the interface plane of the bolted plates, with that stress decreasing as the plate thickness ratio increases reaching its lowest value at the equal-thickness ratio. These results indicate that design stiffness formulas used heretofore are not adequate. Results provided by this analysis should prove more effective in achieving optimum bolt design for bolted joints.« less