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Title: Synthetic Biology in Aqueous Compartments at the Micro- and Nanoscale

Abstract

ABSTRACT Aqueous two-phase systems and related emulsion-based structures defined within micro- and nanoscale environments enable a bottom-up synthetic biological approach to mimicking the dynamic compartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within cells. Model systems we have developed to aid in understanding these phenomena include on-demand generation and triggering of reversible phase transitions in ATPS confined in microscale droplets, morpho-logical changes in networks of femtoliter-volume aqueous droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) formulated in microfluidic channels, and temperature-driven phase transitions in interfacial lipid bilayer systems supported on micro and nanostructured substrates. For each of these cases, the dynamics were intimately linked to changes in the chemical potential of water, which becomes increasingly susceptible to confinement and crowding. At these length scales, where interfacial and surface areas predominate over compartment volumes, both evaporation and osmotic forces become enhanced relative to ideal dilute solutions. Finally, consequences of confinement and crowding in cell-sized microcompartments for increasingly complex scenarios will be discussed, from single-molecule mobility measurements with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to spatio-temporal modulation of resource sharing in cell-free gene expression bursting.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bredesen Center
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bredesen Center; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1394566
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
MRS Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 45; Journal ID: ISSN 2059-8521
Publisher:
Materials Research Society (MRS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; nanostructure; biomimetic (assembly); biomaterial

Citation Formats

Boreyko, Jonathan, Caveney, Patrick M., Norred, Sarah L., Chin, Charles, Retterer, Scott T., Simpson, Michael L., and Collier, C. Pat. Synthetic Biology in Aqueous Compartments at the Micro- and Nanoscale. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1557/adv.2017.489.
Boreyko, Jonathan, Caveney, Patrick M., Norred, Sarah L., Chin, Charles, Retterer, Scott T., Simpson, Michael L., & Collier, C. Pat. Synthetic Biology in Aqueous Compartments at the Micro- and Nanoscale. United States. doi:10.1557/adv.2017.489.
Boreyko, Jonathan, Caveney, Patrick M., Norred, Sarah L., Chin, Charles, Retterer, Scott T., Simpson, Michael L., and Collier, C. Pat. Mon . "Synthetic Biology in Aqueous Compartments at the Micro- and Nanoscale". United States. doi:10.1557/adv.2017.489. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394566.
@article{osti_1394566,
title = {Synthetic Biology in Aqueous Compartments at the Micro- and Nanoscale},
author = {Boreyko, Jonathan and Caveney, Patrick M. and Norred, Sarah L. and Chin, Charles and Retterer, Scott T. and Simpson, Michael L. and Collier, C. Pat},
abstractNote = {ABSTRACT Aqueous two-phase systems and related emulsion-based structures defined within micro- and nanoscale environments enable a bottom-up synthetic biological approach to mimicking the dynamic compartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within cells. Model systems we have developed to aid in understanding these phenomena include on-demand generation and triggering of reversible phase transitions in ATPS confined in microscale droplets, morpho-logical changes in networks of femtoliter-volume aqueous droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) formulated in microfluidic channels, and temperature-driven phase transitions in interfacial lipid bilayer systems supported on micro and nanostructured substrates. For each of these cases, the dynamics were intimately linked to changes in the chemical potential of water, which becomes increasingly susceptible to confinement and crowding. At these length scales, where interfacial and surface areas predominate over compartment volumes, both evaporation and osmotic forces become enhanced relative to ideal dilute solutions. Finally, consequences of confinement and crowding in cell-sized microcompartments for increasingly complex scenarios will be discussed, from single-molecule mobility measurements with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to spatio-temporal modulation of resource sharing in cell-free gene expression bursting.},
doi = {10.1557/adv.2017.489},
journal = {MRS Advances},
issn = {2059-8521},
number = 45,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {7}
}

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