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Title: Drones in Automation - Secured Unmanned Aerial Systems

Abstract

Factories, refineries, utilities (water/wastewater, electric) and related industrial sites are complex systems and structures with inspection and maintenance procedures required for optimal operation and regulatory compliance. As a specific example, consider just the bulk electric power system which is comprised of more than 200,000 miles of highvoltage transmission lines, thousands of generation plants and millions of digital controls. More than 1,800 entities own and operate portions of the grid system, with thousands more involved in the operation of distribution networks across North America. The interconnected and interdependent nature of the bulk power system requires a consistent and systematic application of risk mitigation across the entire grid system to be truly effective. Similar situations are found throughout automation where frequently an aging infrastructure is in place too. Consider, for example, the situation present in a refinery or chemical processing setting with the requirement for leak detection inspection of pipes, interconnects and systems stretching across the plant. The current practices and challenges relating just to this task - leak detection and repair (LDAR) – of detecting any fugitive emissions present and documenting all measurements thereby meeting air compliance regulations are typically “handled” by a small army of individuals with handheld or backpack-sizedmore » detectors who crawl through piping racks conducting measurements at each flange. Such work is performed in difficult conditions (temperature, humidity, physically challenging) with frequently a high level of employee turnover. Finaly, enter low cost sensors and mobile platforms – in other words unmanned aerial systems (UASs, or drones) with enhanced sensing capabilities.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). ISA Test & Measurement Division
  2. X8, LLC, Baltimore MD (United States). ISA Communication Division
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Research Center
  4. Yokogawa US Technology Center (USTC), Sugar Land, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1394436
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
InTech
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0192-303X
Publisher:
Instrument Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; Drones; Automation

Citation Formats

Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E., Rooke, Sterling, Fuhr, Peter L., and Chen, Penny. Drones in Automation - Secured Unmanned Aerial Systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E., Rooke, Sterling, Fuhr, Peter L., & Chen, Penny. Drones in Automation - Secured Unmanned Aerial Systems. United States.
Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E., Rooke, Sterling, Fuhr, Peter L., and Chen, Penny. 2017. "Drones in Automation - Secured Unmanned Aerial Systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1394436,
title = {Drones in Automation - Secured Unmanned Aerial Systems},
author = {Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E. and Rooke, Sterling and Fuhr, Peter L. and Chen, Penny},
abstractNote = {Factories, refineries, utilities (water/wastewater, electric) and related industrial sites are complex systems and structures with inspection and maintenance procedures required for optimal operation and regulatory compliance. As a specific example, consider just the bulk electric power system which is comprised of more than 200,000 miles of highvoltage transmission lines, thousands of generation plants and millions of digital controls. More than 1,800 entities own and operate portions of the grid system, with thousands more involved in the operation of distribution networks across North America. The interconnected and interdependent nature of the bulk power system requires a consistent and systematic application of risk mitigation across the entire grid system to be truly effective. Similar situations are found throughout automation where frequently an aging infrastructure is in place too. Consider, for example, the situation present in a refinery or chemical processing setting with the requirement for leak detection inspection of pipes, interconnects and systems stretching across the plant. The current practices and challenges relating just to this task - leak detection and repair (LDAR) – of detecting any fugitive emissions present and documenting all measurements thereby meeting air compliance regulations are typically “handled” by a small army of individuals with handheld or backpack-sized detectors who crawl through piping racks conducting measurements at each flange. Such work is performed in difficult conditions (temperature, humidity, physically challenging) with frequently a high level of employee turnover. Finaly, enter low cost sensors and mobile platforms – in other words unmanned aerial systems (UASs, or drones) with enhanced sensing capabilities.},
doi = {},
journal = {InTech},
number = 3,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 1, 2018
Publisher's Version of Record
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