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Title: Convergence and Commercial Momentum - Industrial Internet of Things Evolution

Abstract

Industrial instrumentation and sensors are purpose-built for applications. Rugged and proven for field applications in harsh environments, such as on an oil platform or in a copper mine 5,000-feet below ground, these instruments require reliability and performance. Before the turn of the millennium, industrial technology-and information technology (IT) in particular-drove these systems, and they often exceeded the abilities of consumer products. However, as we stand today, commercial Internet of Things (IoT) technology has advanced rapidly, with industrial control systems lagging in intelligence and features. Experienced owner-operators of industrial facilities recognize the buzz surrounding the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) but often shun the notion of consumer-grade devices being installed and integrated into an operational control system. During the International Society of Automation (ISA) Process Control and Safety Forum (PCS) in Houston, Texas, in November 2016, ISA’s Communication Division convened a panel to focus on IIoT. Experienced industrial and control engineers on the panel expressed concerns and reservations with IIoT. Whereas some acknowledged an interest in the topic, others did not recognize it as an inevitable part of the industrial controls landscape. Granted, IIoT is still mostly a vision in the instrumentation and automation landscape; however, its place on stage ismore » coming into view. During the opening session of PCS 2016, ISA President Jim Keaveney rhetorically asked the audience if IoT had peaked and also wondered if “cyber” would be the next area for innovation. This paper will explore the nexus of “domestic” IoT and how product evolution will drive its development toward that of IIoT.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. X8, LLC, Baltimore MD (United States). ISA Communication Division
  3. Yokogawa US Technology Center (USTC), Sugar Land, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1394430
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
InTech
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0192-303X
Publisher:
Instrument Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Fuhr, Peter L., Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E., Rooke, Sterling, and Chen, Penny. Convergence and Commercial Momentum - Industrial Internet of Things Evolution. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Fuhr, Peter L., Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E., Rooke, Sterling, & Chen, Penny. Convergence and Commercial Momentum - Industrial Internet of Things Evolution. United States.
Fuhr, Peter L., Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E., Rooke, Sterling, and Chen, Penny. Wed . "Convergence and Commercial Momentum - Industrial Internet of Things Evolution". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394430.
@article{osti_1394430,
title = {Convergence and Commercial Momentum - Industrial Internet of Things Evolution},
author = {Fuhr, Peter L. and Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E. and Rooke, Sterling and Chen, Penny},
abstractNote = {Industrial instrumentation and sensors are purpose-built for applications. Rugged and proven for field applications in harsh environments, such as on an oil platform or in a copper mine 5,000-feet below ground, these instruments require reliability and performance. Before the turn of the millennium, industrial technology-and information technology (IT) in particular-drove these systems, and they often exceeded the abilities of consumer products. However, as we stand today, commercial Internet of Things (IoT) technology has advanced rapidly, with industrial control systems lagging in intelligence and features. Experienced owner-operators of industrial facilities recognize the buzz surrounding the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) but often shun the notion of consumer-grade devices being installed and integrated into an operational control system. During the International Society of Automation (ISA) Process Control and Safety Forum (PCS) in Houston, Texas, in November 2016, ISA’s Communication Division convened a panel to focus on IIoT. Experienced industrial and control engineers on the panel expressed concerns and reservations with IIoT. Whereas some acknowledged an interest in the topic, others did not recognize it as an inevitable part of the industrial controls landscape. Granted, IIoT is still mostly a vision in the instrumentation and automation landscape; however, its place on stage is coming into view. During the opening session of PCS 2016, ISA President Jim Keaveney rhetorically asked the audience if IoT had peaked and also wondered if “cyber” would be the next area for innovation. This paper will explore the nexus of “domestic” IoT and how product evolution will drive its development toward that of IIoT.},
doi = {},
journal = {InTech},
number = 2,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
The DOI is not currently available

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