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Title: Technical and economic analysis of solvent-based lithium-ion electrode drying with water and NMP

Abstract

Processing lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrode dispersions with water as the solvent during primary drying offers many advantages over N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP). An in-depth analysis of the comparative drying costs of LIB electrodes is discussed for both NMP- and water-based dispersion processing in terms of battery pack $/kWh. Electrode coating manufacturing and capital equipment cost savings are compared for water vs. conventional NMP organic solvent processing. A major finding of this work is that the total electrode manufacturing costs, whether water- or NMP-based, contribute about 8–9% of the total pack cost. However, it was found that up to a 2 × reduction in electrode processing (drying and solvent recovery) cost can be expected along with a $3–6 M savings in associated plant capital equipment (for a plant producing 100,000 10-kWh Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) batteries) using water as the electrode solvent. This paper shows a different perspective in that the most important benefits of aqueous electrode processing actually revolve around capital equipment savings and environmental stewardship and not processing cost savings.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Babcock & Wilcox MEGTEC, De Pere, WI (United States)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1394420
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1424469
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Drying Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0737-3937
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Wood, David L., Quass, Jeffrey D., Li, Jianlin, Ahmed, Shabbir, Ventola, David, and Daniel, Claus. Technical and economic analysis of solvent-based lithium-ion electrode drying with water and NMP. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/07373937.2017.1319855.
Wood, David L., Quass, Jeffrey D., Li, Jianlin, Ahmed, Shabbir, Ventola, David, & Daniel, Claus. Technical and economic analysis of solvent-based lithium-ion electrode drying with water and NMP. United States. doi:10.1080/07373937.2017.1319855.
Wood, David L., Quass, Jeffrey D., Li, Jianlin, Ahmed, Shabbir, Ventola, David, and Daniel, Claus. Tue . "Technical and economic analysis of solvent-based lithium-ion electrode drying with water and NMP". United States. doi:10.1080/07373937.2017.1319855. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394420.
@article{osti_1394420,
title = {Technical and economic analysis of solvent-based lithium-ion electrode drying with water and NMP},
author = {Wood, David L. and Quass, Jeffrey D. and Li, Jianlin and Ahmed, Shabbir and Ventola, David and Daniel, Claus},
abstractNote = {Processing lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrode dispersions with water as the solvent during primary drying offers many advantages over N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP). An in-depth analysis of the comparative drying costs of LIB electrodes is discussed for both NMP- and water-based dispersion processing in terms of battery pack $/kWh. Electrode coating manufacturing and capital equipment cost savings are compared for water vs. conventional NMP organic solvent processing. A major finding of this work is that the total electrode manufacturing costs, whether water- or NMP-based, contribute about 8–9% of the total pack cost. However, it was found that up to a 2 × reduction in electrode processing (drying and solvent recovery) cost can be expected along with a $3–6 M savings in associated plant capital equipment (for a plant producing 100,000 10-kWh Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) batteries) using water as the electrode solvent. This paper shows a different perspective in that the most important benefits of aqueous electrode processing actually revolve around capital equipment savings and environmental stewardship and not processing cost savings.},
doi = {10.1080/07373937.2017.1319855},
journal = {Drying Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 36,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 3works
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  • Processing lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrode dispersions with water as the solvent during primary drying offers many advantages over N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP). An in-depth analysis of the comparative drying costs of LIB electrodes is discussed for both NMP- and water-based dispersion processing in terms of battery pack $/kWh. Electrode coating manufacturing and capital equipment cost savings are compared for water vs. conventional NMP organic solvent processing. A major finding of this work is that the total electrode manufacturing costs, whether water- or NMP-based, contribute about 8–9% of the total pack cost. However, it was found that up to a 2 × reductionmore » in electrode processing (drying and solvent recovery) cost can be expected along with a $3–6 M savings in associated plant capital equipment (for a plant producing 100,000 10-kWh Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) batteries) using water as the electrode solvent. This paper shows a different perspective in that the most important benefits of aqueous electrode processing actually revolve around capital equipment savings and environmental stewardship and not processing cost savings.« less
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