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Title: Synthesis of recent ground-level methane emission measurements from the U.S. natural gas supply chain

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393997
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0004001; FE0025912
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Cleaner Production
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 148; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-22 05:03:42; Journal ID: ISSN 0959-6526
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Littlefield, James A., Marriott, Joe, Schivley, Greg A., and Skone, Timothy J.. Synthesis of recent ground-level methane emission measurements from the U.S. natural gas supply chain. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.101.
Littlefield, James A., Marriott, Joe, Schivley, Greg A., & Skone, Timothy J.. Synthesis of recent ground-level methane emission measurements from the U.S. natural gas supply chain. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.101.
Littlefield, James A., Marriott, Joe, Schivley, Greg A., and Skone, Timothy J.. Sat . "Synthesis of recent ground-level methane emission measurements from the U.S. natural gas supply chain". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.101.
@article{osti_1393997,
title = {Synthesis of recent ground-level methane emission measurements from the U.S. natural gas supply chain},
author = {Littlefield, James A. and Marriott, Joe and Schivley, Greg A. and Skone, Timothy J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.101},
journal = {Journal of Cleaner Production},
number = C,
volume = 148,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.101

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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