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Title: Data dialogues: critical connections for designing and implementing future nanomaterial research

Abstract

Individuals and organizations in the engineered nanomaterial (ENM) community have increasingly recognized two related but distinct concerns: 1) discordant data due to differences in experimental design (e.g., material characteristics, experimental model, exposure concentration) or reporting (e.g., dose metric, material characterization details), and 2) a lack of data to inform decisions about ENM environmental, health, and safety (EHS). As one way to help address these issues, this Commentary discusses the important role of “data dialogues” or structured discussions between ENM researchers in EHS fields (e.g., toxicology, exposure science, and industrial hygiene) and decision makers who use the data researchers collect. The importance of these structured discussions is examined here in the context of barriers, solutions, and incentives: barriers to developing research relevant for human and ecological risk assessments; potential solutions to overcome such barriers; and incentives to help implement these or other solutions. These barriers, solutions, and incentives were identified by a group of expert stakeholders and ENM community members at the December 2013 Society for Risk Analysis panel discussion on research needed to support decision making for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Key topics discussed by experts and ENM community members include: (1) the value of researchers collaborating with EHS decisionmore » makers (e.g., risk analysts, product developers, regulators) to design research that can inform ENM EHS-related decisions (e.g., occupational exposure limits, product safety determinations), (2) the importance of funding incentives for such collaborative research, (3) the need to improve mechanisms for data-sharing within and between sectors (e.g., academia, government, and industry), and (4) the critical need to educate the “next generation” of nanotechnology researchers in EHS topics (e.g., risk assessment, risk management). In presenting these outcomes, this Commentary is not intended to conclude the conversation that took place in December 2013 but rather to support a broader dialogue that helps ensure important risk assessment questions are answered for ENMs.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USEPA
OSTI Identifier:
1393966
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environment Systems & Decisions
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2194-5403
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
communication; engineered nanomaterials; health and environmental risk assessment; research planning; risk management

Citation Formats

Powers, Christina M., Grieger, Khara D., Beaudrie, Christian, Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, Michael Davis, J., Wang, Amy, Sayes, Christie M., MacDonell, Margaret, and Gift, Jeffrey S. Data dialogues: critical connections for designing and implementing future nanomaterial research. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1007/s10669-014-9518-1.
Powers, Christina M., Grieger, Khara D., Beaudrie, Christian, Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, Michael Davis, J., Wang, Amy, Sayes, Christie M., MacDonell, Margaret, & Gift, Jeffrey S. Data dialogues: critical connections for designing and implementing future nanomaterial research. United States. doi:10.1007/s10669-014-9518-1.
Powers, Christina M., Grieger, Khara D., Beaudrie, Christian, Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, Michael Davis, J., Wang, Amy, Sayes, Christie M., MacDonell, Margaret, and Gift, Jeffrey S. Fri . "Data dialogues: critical connections for designing and implementing future nanomaterial research". United States. doi:10.1007/s10669-014-9518-1.
@article{osti_1393966,
title = {Data dialogues: critical connections for designing and implementing future nanomaterial research},
author = {Powers, Christina M. and Grieger, Khara D. and Beaudrie, Christian and Hendren, Christine Ogilvie and Michael Davis, J. and Wang, Amy and Sayes, Christie M. and MacDonell, Margaret and Gift, Jeffrey S.},
abstractNote = {Individuals and organizations in the engineered nanomaterial (ENM) community have increasingly recognized two related but distinct concerns: 1) discordant data due to differences in experimental design (e.g., material characteristics, experimental model, exposure concentration) or reporting (e.g., dose metric, material characterization details), and 2) a lack of data to inform decisions about ENM environmental, health, and safety (EHS). As one way to help address these issues, this Commentary discusses the important role of “data dialogues” or structured discussions between ENM researchers in EHS fields (e.g., toxicology, exposure science, and industrial hygiene) and decision makers who use the data researchers collect. The importance of these structured discussions is examined here in the context of barriers, solutions, and incentives: barriers to developing research relevant for human and ecological risk assessments; potential solutions to overcome such barriers; and incentives to help implement these or other solutions. These barriers, solutions, and incentives were identified by a group of expert stakeholders and ENM community members at the December 2013 Society for Risk Analysis panel discussion on research needed to support decision making for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Key topics discussed by experts and ENM community members include: (1) the value of researchers collaborating with EHS decision makers (e.g., risk analysts, product developers, regulators) to design research that can inform ENM EHS-related decisions (e.g., occupational exposure limits, product safety determinations), (2) the importance of funding incentives for such collaborative research, (3) the need to improve mechanisms for data-sharing within and between sectors (e.g., academia, government, and industry), and (4) the critical need to educate the “next generation” of nanotechnology researchers in EHS topics (e.g., risk assessment, risk management). In presenting these outcomes, this Commentary is not intended to conclude the conversation that took place in December 2013 but rather to support a broader dialogue that helps ensure important risk assessment questions are answered for ENMs.},
doi = {10.1007/s10669-014-9518-1},
journal = {Environment Systems & Decisions},
issn = {2194-5403},
number = 1,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {11}
}

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