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Title: Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: 1. Deep convective updraft properties: Eval. of TWP-ICE CRMs and LAMs Pt. 1

Abstract

Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to D2 rather than D3 eliminates unrealistically large snow reflectivities over 40 dBZ in some simulations. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations, which is partly a result of parameterized microphysics, but also partly a result of overly intense simulated updrafts. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of liquid condensate, often rain, lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. The strongest simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted,more » with some of the strongest showing supercell characteristics during the multicellular (pre-squall) stage of the event. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 to 100 meters slightly weakens deep updraft vertical velocity and moderately decreases the amount of condensate aloft, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may additionally be a product of unrealistic interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and the large-scale model forcing that promote different convective strengths than observed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [7]
  1. Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Utah USA
  2. NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA
  3. Department of Earth Sciences, Florida International University, Miami Florida USA
  4. Laboratoire d'Aerologie, University of Toulouse/CNRS, Toulouse France
  5. Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois USA
  6. Department of Climate Physics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA
  7. Met Office, Exeter UK
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science - Office of Biological and Environmental Research - Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program; USDOE Office of Science - Office of Biological and Environmental Research; National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1393957
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 24; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Varble, Adam, Zipser, Edward J., Fridlind, Ann M., Zhu, Ping, Ackerman, Andrew S., Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre, Collis, Scott, Fan, Jiwen, Hill, Adrian, and Shipway, Ben. Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: 1. Deep convective updraft properties: Eval. of TWP-ICE CRMs and LAMs Pt. 1. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1002/2013JD021371.
Varble, Adam, Zipser, Edward J., Fridlind, Ann M., Zhu, Ping, Ackerman, Andrew S., Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre, Collis, Scott, Fan, Jiwen, Hill, Adrian, & Shipway, Ben. Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: 1. Deep convective updraft properties: Eval. of TWP-ICE CRMs and LAMs Pt. 1. United States. doi:10.1002/2013JD021371.
Varble, Adam, Zipser, Edward J., Fridlind, Ann M., Zhu, Ping, Ackerman, Andrew S., Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre, Collis, Scott, Fan, Jiwen, Hill, Adrian, and Shipway, Ben. Thu . "Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: 1. Deep convective updraft properties: Eval. of TWP-ICE CRMs and LAMs Pt. 1". United States. doi:10.1002/2013JD021371.
@article{osti_1393957,
title = {Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: 1. Deep convective updraft properties: Eval. of TWP-ICE CRMs and LAMs Pt. 1},
author = {Varble, Adam and Zipser, Edward J. and Fridlind, Ann M. and Zhu, Ping and Ackerman, Andrew S. and Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre and Collis, Scott and Fan, Jiwen and Hill, Adrian and Shipway, Ben},
abstractNote = {Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to D2 rather than D3 eliminates unrealistically large snow reflectivities over 40 dBZ in some simulations. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations, which is partly a result of parameterized microphysics, but also partly a result of overly intense simulated updrafts. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of liquid condensate, often rain, lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. The strongest simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted, with some of the strongest showing supercell characteristics during the multicellular (pre-squall) stage of the event. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 to 100 meters slightly weakens deep updraft vertical velocity and moderately decreases the amount of condensate aloft, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may additionally be a product of unrealistic interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and the large-scale model forcing that promote different convective strengths than observed.},
doi = {10.1002/2013JD021371},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
issn = {2169-897X},
number = 24,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {12}
}