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Title: Validating Safecast data by comparisons to a U. S. Department of Energy Fukushima Prefecture aerial survey

Abstract

Safecast is a volunteered geographic information (VGI) project where the lay public collects radiation measurements via hand-held sensors that are uploaded to a central server and then made freely available. However, Safecast data fidelity is uncertain given that the these sensors are hand assembled with various levels of technical proficiency, and that the sensors may not be properly deployed. We validated Safecast data gathered in the Fukushima Prefecture shortly after the Daiichi nuclear power plant catastrophe by comparing it with authoritative data collected by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) during the same period. We found that the two data sets were highly correlated, though the DOE/NNSA observations were generally higher than the Safecast measurements. We concluded that this high correlation alone makes Safecast a viable data source for detecting and monitoring fallout during radiological emergencies.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]
  1. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Geography and Inst. for CyberScience, Geoinformatics and Earth Observation Lab.; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Science and Engineering Div., Geographic Information Science and Technology Group
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Geography and Inst. for CyberScience, Geoinformatics and Earth Observation Lab.
  3. George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Center for Social Complexity, Krasnow Inst. for Advanced Study
  4. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Geography and Inst. for CyberScience, Geoinformatics and Earth Observation Lab.; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). Research Application Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393887
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 171; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0265-931X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Coletti, Mark, Hultquist, Carolynne, Kennedy, William G., and Cervone, Guido. Validating Safecast data by comparisons to a U. S. Department of Energy Fukushima Prefecture aerial survey. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.01.005.
Coletti, Mark, Hultquist, Carolynne, Kennedy, William G., & Cervone, Guido. Validating Safecast data by comparisons to a U. S. Department of Energy Fukushima Prefecture aerial survey. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.01.005.
Coletti, Mark, Hultquist, Carolynne, Kennedy, William G., and Cervone, Guido. Mon . "Validating Safecast data by comparisons to a U. S. Department of Energy Fukushima Prefecture aerial survey". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.01.005. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393887.
@article{osti_1393887,
title = {Validating Safecast data by comparisons to a U. S. Department of Energy Fukushima Prefecture aerial survey},
author = {Coletti, Mark and Hultquist, Carolynne and Kennedy, William G. and Cervone, Guido},
abstractNote = {Safecast is a volunteered geographic information (VGI) project where the lay public collects radiation measurements via hand-held sensors that are uploaded to a central server and then made freely available. However, Safecast data fidelity is uncertain given that the these sensors are hand assembled with various levels of technical proficiency, and that the sensors may not be properly deployed. We validated Safecast data gathered in the Fukushima Prefecture shortly after the Daiichi nuclear power plant catastrophe by comparing it with authoritative data collected by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) during the same period. We found that the two data sets were highly correlated, though the DOE/NNSA observations were generally higher than the Safecast measurements. We concluded that this high correlation alone makes Safecast a viable data source for detecting and monitoring fallout during radiological emergencies.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.01.005},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Radioactivity},
number = C,
volume = 171,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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