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Title: Cost, Time, and Risk Assessment of Different Wave Energy Converter Technology Development Trajectories: Preprint

Abstract

This paper presents a comparative assessment of three fundamentally different wave energy converter technology development trajectories. The three technology development trajectories are expressed and visualised as a function of technology readiness levels and technology performance levels. The assessment shows that development trajectories that initially prioritize technology readiness over technology performance are likely to require twice the development time, consume a threefold of the development cost, and are prone to a risk of technical or commercial failure of one order of magnitude higher than those development trajectories that initially prioritize technology performance over technology readiness.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Wave Venture
  3. Sandia National Laboratories
  4. Ecole Centrale de Nantes
  5. Ramboll
  6. DNV-GL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1393790
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5000-68480
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference, 27 August -1 September 2017, Cork, Ireland
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; wave energy converter; technology development trajectory; development cost; development time; development risk; technology performance level

Citation Formats

Weber, Jochem W, Laird, Daniel, Costello, Ronan, Roberts, Jesse, Bull, Diana, Babarit, Aurelien, Nielsen, Kim, Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt, and Kennedy, Ben. Cost, Time, and Risk Assessment of Different Wave Energy Converter Technology Development Trajectories: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Weber, Jochem W, Laird, Daniel, Costello, Ronan, Roberts, Jesse, Bull, Diana, Babarit, Aurelien, Nielsen, Kim, Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt, & Kennedy, Ben. Cost, Time, and Risk Assessment of Different Wave Energy Converter Technology Development Trajectories: Preprint. United States.
Weber, Jochem W, Laird, Daniel, Costello, Ronan, Roberts, Jesse, Bull, Diana, Babarit, Aurelien, Nielsen, Kim, Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt, and Kennedy, Ben. 2017. "Cost, Time, and Risk Assessment of Different Wave Energy Converter Technology Development Trajectories: Preprint". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393790.
@article{osti_1393790,
title = {Cost, Time, and Risk Assessment of Different Wave Energy Converter Technology Development Trajectories: Preprint},
author = {Weber, Jochem W and Laird, Daniel and Costello, Ronan and Roberts, Jesse and Bull, Diana and Babarit, Aurelien and Nielsen, Kim and Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt and Kennedy, Ben},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a comparative assessment of three fundamentally different wave energy converter technology development trajectories. The three technology development trajectories are expressed and visualised as a function of technology readiness levels and technology performance levels. The assessment shows that development trajectories that initially prioritize technology readiness over technology performance are likely to require twice the development time, consume a threefold of the development cost, and are prone to a risk of technical or commercial failure of one order of magnitude higher than those development trajectories that initially prioritize technology performance over technology readiness.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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