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Title: Biojet fuels and emissions mitigation in aviation: An integrated assessment modeling analysis

Abstract

Although the aviation sector is a relatively small contributor to total greenhouse gas emissions, it is a fast-growing, fossil fuel-intensive transportation mode. Because aviation is a mode for which liquid fuels currently have no practical substitute, biofuels are gaining attention as a promising cleaner alternative. In this paper, we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to develop scenarios that explore the potential impact of biojet fuels for use in aviation in the context of broader climate change mitigation. We show that a carbon price would have a significant impact on the aviation sector. In the absence of alternatives to jet fuel from petroleum, mitigation potential is limited and would be at the expense of aviation service demand growth. However, mitigation efforts through the increased use of biojet fuels show potential to reduce the carbon intensity of aviation, and may not have a significant impact on carbon mitigation and bioenergy use in the rest of the energy system. The potential of biofuel to decarbonize air transport is significantly enhanced when carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is used in the conversion process to produce jet fuels from biomass feedstock.

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393757
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-120807
Journal ID: ISSN 1361-9209; BM0106000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transportation Research. Part D, Transport and Environment; Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: PA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wise, Marshall, Muratori, Matteo, and Kyle, Page. Biojet fuels and emissions mitigation in aviation: An integrated assessment modeling analysis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.trd.2017.03.006.
Wise, Marshall, Muratori, Matteo, & Kyle, Page. Biojet fuels and emissions mitigation in aviation: An integrated assessment modeling analysis. United States. doi:10.1016/j.trd.2017.03.006.
Wise, Marshall, Muratori, Matteo, and Kyle, Page. Mon . "Biojet fuels and emissions mitigation in aviation: An integrated assessment modeling analysis". United States. doi:10.1016/j.trd.2017.03.006.
@article{osti_1393757,
title = {Biojet fuels and emissions mitigation in aviation: An integrated assessment modeling analysis},
author = {Wise, Marshall and Muratori, Matteo and Kyle, Page},
abstractNote = {Although the aviation sector is a relatively small contributor to total greenhouse gas emissions, it is a fast-growing, fossil fuel-intensive transportation mode. Because aviation is a mode for which liquid fuels currently have no practical substitute, biofuels are gaining attention as a promising cleaner alternative. In this paper, we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to develop scenarios that explore the potential impact of biojet fuels for use in aviation in the context of broader climate change mitigation. We show that a carbon price would have a significant impact on the aviation sector. In the absence of alternatives to jet fuel from petroleum, mitigation potential is limited and would be at the expense of aviation service demand growth. However, mitigation efforts through the increased use of biojet fuels show potential to reduce the carbon intensity of aviation, and may not have a significant impact on carbon mitigation and bioenergy use in the rest of the energy system. The potential of biofuel to decarbonize air transport is significantly enhanced when carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is used in the conversion process to produce jet fuels from biomass feedstock.},
doi = {10.1016/j.trd.2017.03.006},
journal = {Transportation Research. Part D, Transport and Environment},
number = PA,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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