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Title: Reframing climate change assessments around risk: recommendations for the US National Climate Assessment

Abstract

Climate change is a risk management challenge for society, with uncertain but potentially severe outcomes affecting natural and human systems, across generations. Managing climate-related risks will be more difficult without a base of knowledge and practice aimed at identifying and evaluating specific risks, and their likelihood and consequences, as well as potential actions to promote resilience in the face of these risks. Here, we suggest three improvements to the process of conducting climate change assessments to better characterize risk and inform risk management actions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), College Park, MD (United States)
  3. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  4. Pacific Institute, Oakland, CA (United States)
  5. Social and Environmental Research Institute, Northampton, MA (United States)
  6. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
  7. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)
  8. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USEPA
OSTI Identifier:
1393755
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-127975
Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climate; assessments; risk framing

Citation Formats

Weaver, C. P., Moss, Richard H., Ebi, Kristie L., Gleick, Peter H., Stern, Paul C., Tebaldi, Claudia, Wilson, Robyn S., and Arvai, J. L. Reframing climate change assessments around risk: recommendations for the US National Climate Assessment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa7494.
Weaver, C. P., Moss, Richard H., Ebi, Kristie L., Gleick, Peter H., Stern, Paul C., Tebaldi, Claudia, Wilson, Robyn S., & Arvai, J. L. Reframing climate change assessments around risk: recommendations for the US National Climate Assessment. United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa7494.
Weaver, C. P., Moss, Richard H., Ebi, Kristie L., Gleick, Peter H., Stern, Paul C., Tebaldi, Claudia, Wilson, Robyn S., and Arvai, J. L. 2017. "Reframing climate change assessments around risk: recommendations for the US National Climate Assessment". United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa7494. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393755.
@article{osti_1393755,
title = {Reframing climate change assessments around risk: recommendations for the US National Climate Assessment},
author = {Weaver, C. P. and Moss, Richard H. and Ebi, Kristie L. and Gleick, Peter H. and Stern, Paul C. and Tebaldi, Claudia and Wilson, Robyn S. and Arvai, J. L.},
abstractNote = {Climate change is a risk management challenge for society, with uncertain but potentially severe outcomes affecting natural and human systems, across generations. Managing climate-related risks will be more difficult without a base of knowledge and practice aimed at identifying and evaluating specific risks, and their likelihood and consequences, as well as potential actions to promote resilience in the face of these risks. Here, we suggest three improvements to the process of conducting climate change assessments to better characterize risk and inform risk management actions.},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/aa7494},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
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