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Title: Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague

Abstract

Adaptive processes in bacterial species can occur rapidly in laboratory culture, leading to genetic divergence between naturally occurring and laboratory-adapted strains. Differentiating wild and closely-related laboratory strains is clearly important for biodefense and bioforensics; however, DNA sequence data alone has thus far not provided a clear signature, perhaps due to lack of understanding of how diverse genome changes lead to adapted phenotypes. Protein abundance profiles from mass spectrometry-based proteomics analyses are a molecular measure of phenotype. Proteomics data contains sufficient information that powerful statistical methods can uncover signatures that distinguish wild strains of Yersinia pestis from laboratory-adapted strains.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  3. Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)
  4. George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1393747
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123853
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203; 49532
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830; GM094623
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory; Yersinia pestis; Proteomic databases; Data mining; Protein abundance; Protein expression; Data processing; Ethanol; Government laboratories

Citation Formats

Merkley, Eric D., Sego, Landon H., Lin, Andy, Leiser, Owen P., Kaiser, Brooke L. Deatherage, Adkins, Joshua N., Keim, Paul S., Wagner, David M., Kreuzer, Helen W., and Hakami, Ramin M. Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0183478.
Merkley, Eric D., Sego, Landon H., Lin, Andy, Leiser, Owen P., Kaiser, Brooke L. Deatherage, Adkins, Joshua N., Keim, Paul S., Wagner, David M., Kreuzer, Helen W., & Hakami, Ramin M. Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0183478.
Merkley, Eric D., Sego, Landon H., Lin, Andy, Leiser, Owen P., Kaiser, Brooke L. Deatherage, Adkins, Joshua N., Keim, Paul S., Wagner, David M., Kreuzer, Helen W., and Hakami, Ramin M. 2017. "Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0183478. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393747.
@article{osti_1393747,
title = {Protein abundances can distinguish between naturally-occurring and laboratory strains of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague},
author = {Merkley, Eric D. and Sego, Landon H. and Lin, Andy and Leiser, Owen P. and Kaiser, Brooke L. Deatherage and Adkins, Joshua N. and Keim, Paul S. and Wagner, David M. and Kreuzer, Helen W. and Hakami, Ramin M.},
abstractNote = {Adaptive processes in bacterial species can occur rapidly in laboratory culture, leading to genetic divergence between naturally occurring and laboratory-adapted strains. Differentiating wild and closely-related laboratory strains is clearly important for biodefense and bioforensics; however, DNA sequence data alone has thus far not provided a clear signature, perhaps due to lack of understanding of how diverse genome changes lead to adapted phenotypes. Protein abundance profiles from mass spectrometry-based proteomics analyses are a molecular measure of phenotype. Proteomics data contains sufficient information that powerful statistical methods can uncover signatures that distinguish wild strains of Yersinia pestis from laboratory-adapted strains.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0183478},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 8,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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