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Title: Polarizing Oxygen Vacancies in Insulating Metal Oxides under a High Electric Field

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393703
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 12; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-21 10:13:43; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Youssef, Mostafa, Van Vliet, Krystyn J., and Yildiz, Bilge. Polarizing Oxygen Vacancies in Insulating Metal Oxides under a High Electric Field. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.126002.
Youssef, Mostafa, Van Vliet, Krystyn J., & Yildiz, Bilge. Polarizing Oxygen Vacancies in Insulating Metal Oxides under a High Electric Field. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.126002.
Youssef, Mostafa, Van Vliet, Krystyn J., and Yildiz, Bilge. 2017. "Polarizing Oxygen Vacancies in Insulating Metal Oxides under a High Electric Field". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.126002.
@article{osti_1393703,
title = {Polarizing Oxygen Vacancies in Insulating Metal Oxides under a High Electric Field},
author = {Youssef, Mostafa and Van Vliet, Krystyn J. and Yildiz, Bilge},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.126002},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 12,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 21, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Spatially resolved x-ray fluorescence maps are presented that show the introduction and the evolution of oxygen vacancies in chromium-doped strontium titanate during an electric-field-driven insulator-to-metal transition. The vacancies are introduced at the anode and diffuse through the crystal toward the cathode. The spatial distribution of vacancies is explained by a model describing the electrical breakdown as a percolation process. Strong differences in the vacancy distribution were found when the transition took place in air and in a hydrogen-enriched atmosphere. In air, the vacancies disappeared from the surface, whereas in the reducing hydrogen atmosphere, they remained at the surface.
  • The dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration driven by the external electric field is directly observed at atomic scale in the cerium oxides (CeO{sub 2}) thin film by in-situ transmission electron microscopy method. When a bias voltage of a proper value is applied across the CeO{sub 2} film, the oxygen vacancies are formed near the interface of CeO{sub 2}/anode, followed by their migration along the direction of the external electric field. The structural modulation occurs in the [110] zone axis due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The migration of oxygen vacancies results in the reversible structural transformation, i.e., releasingmore » and storing oxygen processes in CeO{sub 2}, which is of great significance for the ionic and electronic applications of the cerium oxides materials, such as oxygen pump, gas sensor, resistive random access memory, etc.« less
  • Oxygen vacancies and their effects on electrical conduction in some metal oxides were considered through an exact solution of the equilibrium relations between oxygen partial pressure in the ambient gas and concentrations of oxygen vacancies and conduction electrons in the oxide. The mass-action law was assumed but no state of ionization of oxygen vacancies was neglected. Concentrations of electrons in conduction states and total oxygen vacancies were considered. The results, which possess considerable complexity not contained in the usual limiting-case solutions, were compared with pertinent experiments. (auth)
  • It is known that MgO subjected to moderate electric fields at high temperature becomes progressively more conducting till it breaks down. We report a similar phenomenon in spinel. The insulating properties of stoichiometric spinel degrade even more rapidly than those of MgO; commercial spinel, which contains excess aluminum as well as hydrogen, exhibits erratic variations in conductance and general electrical instability, but does not always degrade to breakdown. Other insulating oxides (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, forsterite, quartz, and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/) maintain their insulating properties when moderate dc electric fields (approx. 1000 V/cm) are applied at temperatures near 1200/sup 0/C.