skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs

Abstract

The Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs research describe a variety of DR opportunities and the various bulk power system services they can provide. The bulk power system services are mapped to a generalized taxonomy of DR “service types”, which allows us to discuss DR opportunities and bulk power system services in fewer yet broader categories that share similar technological requirements which mainly drive DR enablement costs. The research presents a framework for the costs to automate DR and provides descriptions of the various elements that drive enablement costs. The report introduces the various DR enabling technologies and end-uses, identifies the various services that each can provide to the grid and provides the cost assessment for each enabling technology. In addition to a report, this research includes a Demand Response Advanced Controls Database and User Manual. They are intended to provide users with the data that underlies this research and instructions for how to use that database more effectively and efficiently.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1393639
Report Number(s):
LBNL-2001044
ark:/13030/qt0229m0q2
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Potter, Jennifer, and Cappers, Peter. Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1393639.
Potter, Jennifer, & Cappers, Peter. Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs. United States. doi:10.2172/1393639.
Potter, Jennifer, and Cappers, Peter. Mon . "Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs". United States. doi:10.2172/1393639. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393639.
@article{osti_1393639,
title = {Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs},
author = {Potter, Jennifer and Cappers, Peter},
abstractNote = {The Demand Response Advanced Controls Framework and Assessment of Enabling Technology Costs research describe a variety of DR opportunities and the various bulk power system services they can provide. The bulk power system services are mapped to a generalized taxonomy of DR “service types”, which allows us to discuss DR opportunities and bulk power system services in fewer yet broader categories that share similar technological requirements which mainly drive DR enablement costs. The research presents a framework for the costs to automate DR and provides descriptions of the various elements that drive enablement costs. The report introduces the various DR enabling technologies and end-uses, identifies the various services that each can provide to the grid and provides the cost assessment for each enabling technology. In addition to a report, this research includes a Demand Response Advanced Controls Database and User Manual. They are intended to provide users with the data that underlies this research and instructions for how to use that database more effectively and efficiently.},
doi = {10.2172/1393639},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The overall goals of the study are to improve the understanding of demand response (DR) opportunities in data centers and evaluate an initial set of control strategies in field tests.
  • This report describes a market and load research study on a small group of participants in the NYISO Emergency Demand Response Program (EDRP) and the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction and Enabling Technology Program Opportunity Notices. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 individual customers that participated in the NYISO EDRP program through New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG), AES NewEnergy, and eBidenergy/ ConsumerPowerLine. These contractors used funding from NYSERDA to apply enabling technologies that were hypothesized to improve customers' ability to curtail load. Both NYSEG and eBidenergy/ConsumerPowerLine offered their customers access to their hourly load data on a day-after basismore » and, during curtailment events, on a near-real-time basis. Phone interviews were conducted with most customers, however 25% of customers provided initial responses to the survey protocol via email. We then combined the market research information with load data during the curtailment events of August 7-10, 2001 to evaluate the impact of technology on curtailment responses.« less
  • The uncertainties in Volume I without extensive additional engineering effort were identified and quantified. Substantial uncertainty was found in several critical variables, allowing a broad range of possible values. Calculations of the cost impact associated with such broad ranges, however, did not always result in significant differences. Seven major areas of pollution control activity were judged to warrant the assessment effort. Three of these areas were found to contain significant uncertainty and additional research is suggested. These areas are: H/sub 2/S removal from the retort gas stream (Stretford process); organic removal from process wastewaters (bio-oxidation or other alternatives); and slurrymore » backfilling of spent Modified In Situ (MIS) retorts. The overall results of the assessment and analysis process are summarized in Table 1-1 in terms of total cost for pollution control. The distributions have been divided into three ranges in this table. A center range is given which contains 80% to 90% probability, and the costs outside this range with probabilities are given. The full distributions can be found in Section 5.0. The subjective probability distributions are a quantification of opinion. The probability of encountering costs below the low figure or above the high figure for each process and scenario is judged to be nearly zero.« less
  • The objectives of this scoping study were to develop and test control software and wireless hardware that could enable closed-loop, zone-temperature-based demand response in buildings that have either pneumatic controls or legacy digital controls that cannot be used as part of a demand response automation system. We designed a SOAP client that is compatible with the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) being used by the IOUs in California for their CPP program, design the DR control software, investigated the use of cellular routers for connecting to the DRAS, and tested the wireless DR system with an emulator running a calibratedmore » model of a working building. The results show that the wireless DR system can shed approximately 1.5 Watts per design CFM on the design day in a hot, inland climate in California while keeping temperatures within the limits of ASHRAE Standard 55: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.« less