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Title: The impact of ancillary services in optimal DER investment decisions

Abstract

Microgrid resource sizing problems typically include the analysis of a combination of value streams such as peak shaving, load shifting, or load scheduling, which support the economic feasibility of the microgrid deployment. However, microgrid benefits can go beyond these, and the ability to provide ancillary grid services such as frequency regulation or spinning and non-spinning reserves is well known, despite typically not being considered in resource sizing problems. This paper proposes the expansion of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), a state-of-the-art microgrid resource sizing model, to include revenue streams resulting from the participation in ancillary service markets. Results suggest that participation in such markets may not only influence the optimum resource sizing, but also the operational dispatch, with results being strongly influenced by the exact market requirements and clearing prices.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Center for Energy and Innovative Technologies (CET), Hofamt Priel (Austria)
  3. Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)
OSTI Identifier:
1393620
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1397081
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy (Oxford)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Energy (Oxford); Journal Volume: 130; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0360-5442
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Cardoso, Goncalo, Stadler, Michael, Mashayekh, Salman, and Hartvigsson, Elias. The impact of ancillary services in optimal DER investment decisions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.energy.2017.04.124.
Cardoso, Goncalo, Stadler, Michael, Mashayekh, Salman, & Hartvigsson, Elias. The impact of ancillary services in optimal DER investment decisions. United States. doi:10.1016/j.energy.2017.04.124.
Cardoso, Goncalo, Stadler, Michael, Mashayekh, Salman, and Hartvigsson, Elias. Tue . "The impact of ancillary services in optimal DER investment decisions". United States. doi:10.1016/j.energy.2017.04.124. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393620.
@article{osti_1393620,
title = {The impact of ancillary services in optimal DER investment decisions},
author = {Cardoso, Goncalo and Stadler, Michael and Mashayekh, Salman and Hartvigsson, Elias},
abstractNote = {Microgrid resource sizing problems typically include the analysis of a combination of value streams such as peak shaving, load shifting, or load scheduling, which support the economic feasibility of the microgrid deployment. However, microgrid benefits can go beyond these, and the ability to provide ancillary grid services such as frequency regulation or spinning and non-spinning reserves is well known, despite typically not being considered in resource sizing problems. This paper proposes the expansion of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), a state-of-the-art microgrid resource sizing model, to include revenue streams resulting from the participation in ancillary service markets. Results suggest that participation in such markets may not only influence the optimum resource sizing, but also the operational dispatch, with results being strongly influenced by the exact market requirements and clearing prices.},
doi = {10.1016/j.energy.2017.04.124},
journal = {Energy (Oxford)},
number = C,
volume = 130,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 25 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 25 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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