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Title: Apply or Die: On the Role and Assessment of Application Papers in Visualization

Abstract

Application-oriented papers provide an important way to invigorate and cross-pollinate the visualization field, but the exact criteria for judging an application paper's merit remain an open question. This article builds on a panel at the 2016 IEEE Visualization Conference entitled "Application Papers: What Are They, and How Should They Be Evaluated?" that sought to gain a better understanding of prevalent views in the visualization community. This article surveys current trends that favor application papers, reviews the benefits and contributions of this paper type, and discusses their assessment in the review process. It concludes with recommendations to ensure that the visualization community is more inclusive to application papers.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Calgary, AB (Canada)
  3. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  4. Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)
  5. Technische Univ. Kaiserlautern (Germany)
  6. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
  7. Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
OSTI Identifier:
1393605
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0272-1716
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Weber, Gunther H., Carpendale, Sheelagh, Ebert, David, Fisher, Brian, Hagen, Hans, Shneiderman, Ben, and Ynnerman, Anders. Apply or Die: On the Role and Assessment of Application Papers in Visualization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/MCG.2017.51.
Weber, Gunther H., Carpendale, Sheelagh, Ebert, David, Fisher, Brian, Hagen, Hans, Shneiderman, Ben, & Ynnerman, Anders. Apply or Die: On the Role and Assessment of Application Papers in Visualization. United States. doi:10.1109/MCG.2017.51.
Weber, Gunther H., Carpendale, Sheelagh, Ebert, David, Fisher, Brian, Hagen, Hans, Shneiderman, Ben, and Ynnerman, Anders. 2017. "Apply or Die: On the Role and Assessment of Application Papers in Visualization". United States. doi:10.1109/MCG.2017.51.
@article{osti_1393605,
title = {Apply or Die: On the Role and Assessment of Application Papers in Visualization},
author = {Weber, Gunther H. and Carpendale, Sheelagh and Ebert, David and Fisher, Brian and Hagen, Hans and Shneiderman, Ben and Ynnerman, Anders},
abstractNote = {Application-oriented papers provide an important way to invigorate and cross-pollinate the visualization field, but the exact criteria for judging an application paper's merit remain an open question. This article builds on a panel at the 2016 IEEE Visualization Conference entitled "Application Papers: What Are They, and How Should They Be Evaluated?" that sought to gain a better understanding of prevalent views in the visualization community. This article surveys current trends that favor application papers, reviews the benefits and contributions of this paper type, and discusses their assessment in the review process. It concludes with recommendations to ensure that the visualization community is more inclusive to application papers.},
doi = {10.1109/MCG.2017.51},
journal = {IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications},
number = 3,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on April 26, 2018
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