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Title: Cell-Free Synthetic Biology Chassis for Nanocatalytic Photon-to-Hydrogen Conversion

Abstract

We report on entirely man-made nanobio hybrid fabricated through assembly of cell-free expressed transmembrane proton pump and semiconductor nanoparticles as an efficient nanocatalysis for photocatalytic H 2 evolution. The system produces H 2 at a turnover rate of 239 (μmole protein) -1 h -1 under green and 17742 (μmole protein) -1 h -1 under white light at ambient conditions, in water at neutral pH with methanol as a sacrificial electron donor. Robustness and flexibility of this approach allows for systemic manipulation at nanoparticle-bio interface toward directed evolution of energy transformation materials and artificial systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [6]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Shandong Univ. (China). Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials
  2. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Materials Science Div.
  4. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow (Russian Federation). Laboratory Chemistry and Physics of Lipids, Department of General and Applied Physics
  5. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  6. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Basic Research Program of China; Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation; USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1393574
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Nano
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1936-0851
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; TiO2; cell-free; hydrogen; nanoparticles; solar-to-fuel conversion; synthetic biology

Citation Formats

Wang, Peng, Chang, Angela Y., Novosad, Valentyn, Chupin, Vladimir V., Schaller, Richard D., and Rozhkova, Elena A. Cell-Free Synthetic Biology Chassis for Nanocatalytic Photon-to-Hydrogen Conversion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsnano.7b01142.
Wang, Peng, Chang, Angela Y., Novosad, Valentyn, Chupin, Vladimir V., Schaller, Richard D., & Rozhkova, Elena A. Cell-Free Synthetic Biology Chassis for Nanocatalytic Photon-to-Hydrogen Conversion. United States. doi:10.1021/acsnano.7b01142.
Wang, Peng, Chang, Angela Y., Novosad, Valentyn, Chupin, Vladimir V., Schaller, Richard D., and Rozhkova, Elena A. Sun . "Cell-Free Synthetic Biology Chassis for Nanocatalytic Photon-to-Hydrogen Conversion". United States. doi:10.1021/acsnano.7b01142.
@article{osti_1393574,
title = {Cell-Free Synthetic Biology Chassis for Nanocatalytic Photon-to-Hydrogen Conversion},
author = {Wang, Peng and Chang, Angela Y. and Novosad, Valentyn and Chupin, Vladimir V. and Schaller, Richard D. and Rozhkova, Elena A.},
abstractNote = {We report on entirely man-made nanobio hybrid fabricated through assembly of cell-free expressed transmembrane proton pump and semiconductor nanoparticles as an efficient nanocatalysis for photocatalytic H2 evolution. The system produces H2 at a turnover rate of 239 (μmole protein)-1 h-1 under green and 17742 (μmole protein)-1 h-1 under white light at ambient conditions, in water at neutral pH with methanol as a sacrificial electron donor. Robustness and flexibility of this approach allows for systemic manipulation at nanoparticle-bio interface toward directed evolution of energy transformation materials and artificial systems.},
doi = {10.1021/acsnano.7b01142},
journal = {ACS Nano},
number = 7,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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