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Title: Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications at ABAA-9

Abstract

The battery-electrified vehicle industry is booming since the last decade, orientated by consumers’ growing demand for ''green'' cars with zero-emission of the greenhouse gases and the speedy-but-silent driving experience. Aiming for advanced battery technology to support electric vehicles, the International Conference on Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications (ABAA) was launched in 2008. This paper describes the activities at ABAA-9.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Div.
  2. China Council for the Promotion of International Trade, Huzhou Committee, Huzhou, Zhejinag Province (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1393544
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Energy Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2380-8195
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Zhan, Chun, Cai, Feng, Amine, Khalil, and Lu, Jun. Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications at ABAA-9. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00407.
Zhan, Chun, Cai, Feng, Amine, Khalil, & Lu, Jun. Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications at ABAA-9. United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00407.
Zhan, Chun, Cai, Feng, Amine, Khalil, and Lu, Jun. 2017. "Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications at ABAA-9". United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00407.
@article{osti_1393544,
title = {Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications at ABAA-9},
author = {Zhan, Chun and Cai, Feng and Amine, Khalil and Lu, Jun},
abstractNote = {The battery-electrified vehicle industry is booming since the last decade, orientated by consumers’ growing demand for ''green'' cars with zero-emission of the greenhouse gases and the speedy-but-silent driving experience. Aiming for advanced battery technology to support electric vehicles, the International Conference on Advanced Lithium Batteries for Automobile Applications (ABAA) was launched in 2008. This paper describes the activities at ABAA-9.},
doi = {10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00407},
journal = {ACS Energy Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 14, 2018
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