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Title: 177 Lu-Labeled Phosphoramidate-Based PSMA Inhibitors: The Effect of an Albumin Binder on Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficacy in Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice

Abstract

Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) continues to be an active biomarker for small-molecule PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer and various non-prostatic tumors that are characterized by PSMA expression on their neovasculature. One of the challenges for small-molecule PSMA inhibitors with respect to delivering therapeutic payloads is their rapid renal clearance. In order to overcome this pharmacokinetic challenge, we outfitted a 177Lu-labeled phosphoramidate-based PSMA inhibitor (CTT1298) with an albumin-binding motif (CTT1403) and compared its in vivo performance with that of an analogous compound lacking the albumin-binding motif (CTT1401). The radiolabeling of CTT1401 and CTT1403 was achieved using click chemistry to connect 177Lu-DOTA-N3 to the dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-bearing CTT1298 inhibitor cores. A direct comparison in vitro and in vivo performance was made for CTT1401 and CTT1403; the specificity and efficacy by means of cellular uptake and internalization, biodistribution, and therapeutic efficacy were determined for both compounds. And while both compounds displayed excellent uptake and rapid internalization in PSMA+ PC3-PIP cells, the albumin binding moiety in CTT1403 conferred clear advantages to the PSMA-inhibitor scaffold including increased circulating half-life and prostate tumor uptake that continued to increase up to 168 h post-injection. This then increased tumor uptake translated into superior therapeutic efficacy ofmore » CTT1403 in PSMA+ PC3-PIP human xenograft tumors.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Cancer Targeted Technology, Woodinville, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Medicine
  3. Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Dept. of Bioengineering, Dept. of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1393445
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0008833; HHSN261201500074C
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Theranostics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1838-7640
Publisher:
Ivyspring
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; PSMA; albumin; phosphoramidate; 177Lu; radiotherapy

Citation Formats

Choy, Cindy J., Ling, Xiaoxi, Geruntho, Jonathan J., Beyer, Sophia K., Latoche, Joseph D., Langton-Webster, Beatrice, Anderson, Carolyn J., and Berkman, Clifford E. 177 Lu-Labeled Phosphoramidate-Based PSMA Inhibitors: The Effect of an Albumin Binder on Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficacy in Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.7150/thno.18719.
Choy, Cindy J., Ling, Xiaoxi, Geruntho, Jonathan J., Beyer, Sophia K., Latoche, Joseph D., Langton-Webster, Beatrice, Anderson, Carolyn J., & Berkman, Clifford E. 177 Lu-Labeled Phosphoramidate-Based PSMA Inhibitors: The Effect of an Albumin Binder on Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficacy in Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice. United States. doi:10.7150/thno.18719.
Choy, Cindy J., Ling, Xiaoxi, Geruntho, Jonathan J., Beyer, Sophia K., Latoche, Joseph D., Langton-Webster, Beatrice, Anderson, Carolyn J., and Berkman, Clifford E. 2017. "177 Lu-Labeled Phosphoramidate-Based PSMA Inhibitors: The Effect of an Albumin Binder on Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficacy in Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice". United States. doi:10.7150/thno.18719. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393445.
@article{osti_1393445,
title = {177 Lu-Labeled Phosphoramidate-Based PSMA Inhibitors: The Effect of an Albumin Binder on Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficacy in Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice},
author = {Choy, Cindy J. and Ling, Xiaoxi and Geruntho, Jonathan J. and Beyer, Sophia K. and Latoche, Joseph D. and Langton-Webster, Beatrice and Anderson, Carolyn J. and Berkman, Clifford E.},
abstractNote = {Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) continues to be an active biomarker for small-molecule PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer and various non-prostatic tumors that are characterized by PSMA expression on their neovasculature. One of the challenges for small-molecule PSMA inhibitors with respect to delivering therapeutic payloads is their rapid renal clearance. In order to overcome this pharmacokinetic challenge, we outfitted a 177Lu-labeled phosphoramidate-based PSMA inhibitor (CTT1298) with an albumin-binding motif (CTT1403) and compared its in vivo performance with that of an analogous compound lacking the albumin-binding motif (CTT1401). The radiolabeling of CTT1401 and CTT1403 was achieved using click chemistry to connect 177Lu-DOTA-N3 to the dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-bearing CTT1298 inhibitor cores. A direct comparison in vitro and in vivo performance was made for CTT1401 and CTT1403; the specificity and efficacy by means of cellular uptake and internalization, biodistribution, and therapeutic efficacy were determined for both compounds. And while both compounds displayed excellent uptake and rapid internalization in PSMA+ PC3-PIP cells, the albumin binding moiety in CTT1403 conferred clear advantages to the PSMA-inhibitor scaffold including increased circulating half-life and prostate tumor uptake that continued to increase up to 168 h post-injection. This then increased tumor uptake translated into superior therapeutic efficacy of CTT1403 in PSMA+ PC3-PIP human xenograft tumors.},
doi = {10.7150/thno.18719},
journal = {Theranostics},
number = 7,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

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  • Here in this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [ 18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(-) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or withoutmore » blocking agent. The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [ 18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(-) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. In conclusion, we have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [ 18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa.« less
  • Biodistribution, pharmacokinetic, and radioimaging studies were performed with 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 whole antibody in athymic nude mice bearing the LS174T tumor growing either s.c. or in an experimental hepatic metastasis model. NR-LU-10 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) that reacts with virtually all human tumors of epithelial origin. NR-BC-1, a IgG2b murine MAb that reacts with normal human B-cell and B malignancies, was used as an isotype-matched control. These MAbs were radiolabeled with 186Re by a preformed chelate approach by using the triamide thiolate ligand system. 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 (50 microCi) was injected into nude mice bearing LS174T tumors growing s.c.more » Biodistribution studies revealed that the LS174T tumor retained the highest concentration of 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 at day 6. The tumor:blood ratio ranged from 0.1:1 to 10.8:1 by day 6, the last day of analysis. In contrast the tumor:blood ratio of 186Re-labeled NR-BC-1, the isotype-matched MAb control, was 1:1 on day 6. Pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that the t1/2 beta of NR-LU-10 for blood and other tissues ranged from 21 to 25 h, while the t1/2 beta for the LS174T tumor averaged 52 h. The area under the curve for tumor compared to blood was 2.8- to 5.7-fold higher than the area under the curve for all other tissues and organs. The mean residence time for NR-LU-10 in blood and all other organs ranged from 23 to 26 h, while the mean residence time for NR-LU-10 in the LS174T tumor was 72 h. Scintigraphic images revealed selective uptake of the 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10, but not of the 186Re-labeled NR-BC-1, at the LS174T tumor site. Studies in an experimental model of hepatic metastasis revealed a similar selective pattern of 186Re-labeled NR-LU-10 accumulation. Scintigraphic images of the LS174T tumor growing within the athymic nude mouse liver were obtained.« less
  • The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In-more » and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.« less
  • The pharmacokinetics of two iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled murine anti-rat colon carcinoma monoclonal antibodies (D3 and E4) were compared in normal Sprague Dawley rats, syngeneic BDIX rats, or nude mice bearing that tumor. Results of antibody uptake after i.v. administration were analyzed in terms of accumulation and localization indices for normal tissues and tumor. Statistically significant differences between rat and mouse tissue biodistribution were found. D3, which reacts in vitro with the tumor and several normal rat tissues, cleared quickly from the blood of rats and was specifically targeted to several normal tissues, notably the lung. Virtually no targeting to themore » tumor was observed. Nude mice, however, showed a slower blood clearance and specific antibody targeting only in the tumor. Similar results were seen after injection of another antibody, E4, which is tumor-specific in vitro. Data suggest that studies on the xenogeneic nude mouse model may not necessarily be relevant to the choice of monoclonal antibodies for clinical diagnostic imaging or therapy.« less