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Title: Predicting Cavitation on Marine and Hydrokinetic Turbine Blades with AeroDyn V15.04

Abstract

Cavitation is an important consideration in the design of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's AeroDyn performance code was originally developed for horizontal-axis wind turbines and did not have the capability to predict cavitation inception. Therefore, AeroDyn has been updated to include the ability to predict cavitation on MHK turbines based on user-specified vapor pressure and submerged depth. This report outlines a verification of the AeroDyn V15.04 performance code for MHK turbines through a comparison to publicly available performance data.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1393384
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5000-68398
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; marine and hydrokinetic; MHK; cavitation; AeroDyn; verification; turbine; NREL

Citation Formats

Murray, Robynne. Predicting Cavitation on Marine and Hydrokinetic Turbine Blades with AeroDyn V15.04. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1393384.
Murray, Robynne. Predicting Cavitation on Marine and Hydrokinetic Turbine Blades with AeroDyn V15.04. United States. doi:10.2172/1393384.
Murray, Robynne. 2017. "Predicting Cavitation on Marine and Hydrokinetic Turbine Blades with AeroDyn V15.04". United States. doi:10.2172/1393384. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393384.
@article{osti_1393384,
title = {Predicting Cavitation on Marine and Hydrokinetic Turbine Blades with AeroDyn V15.04},
author = {Murray, Robynne},
abstractNote = {Cavitation is an important consideration in the design of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's AeroDyn performance code was originally developed for horizontal-axis wind turbines and did not have the capability to predict cavitation inception. Therefore, AeroDyn has been updated to include the ability to predict cavitation on MHK turbines based on user-specified vapor pressure and submerged depth. This report outlines a verification of the AeroDyn V15.04 performance code for MHK turbines through a comparison to publicly available performance data.},
doi = {10.2172/1393384},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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