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Title: The National Ignition Laser Performance Status

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more »; ; ; ; « less
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393365
Report Number(s):
LLNL-CONF-738077
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 10th International Conference on Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications (IFSA), San Malo, France, Sep 11 - Sep 15, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Di Nicola, J M, Bond, T, Bowers, M, Chang, L, Hermann, M, House, R, Manes, K, Mennerat, G, MacGowan, B, Negres, R, Nostrand, M, Olejniczak, B, Orth, C, Parham, T, Rana, S, Raymond, B, Shaw, M, Spaeth, M, Suratwala, T, Van Wonterghem, B, Williams, W, Widmayer, C, Yang, S, and Wegner, P. The National Ignition Laser Performance Status. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Di Nicola, J M, Bond, T, Bowers, M, Chang, L, Hermann, M, House, R, Manes, K, Mennerat, G, MacGowan, B, Negres, R, Nostrand, M, Olejniczak, B, Orth, C, Parham, T, Rana, S, Raymond, B, Shaw, M, Spaeth, M, Suratwala, T, Van Wonterghem, B, Williams, W, Widmayer, C, Yang, S, & Wegner, P. The National Ignition Laser Performance Status. United States.
Di Nicola, J M, Bond, T, Bowers, M, Chang, L, Hermann, M, House, R, Manes, K, Mennerat, G, MacGowan, B, Negres, R, Nostrand, M, Olejniczak, B, Orth, C, Parham, T, Rana, S, Raymond, B, Shaw, M, Spaeth, M, Suratwala, T, Van Wonterghem, B, Williams, W, Widmayer, C, Yang, S, and Wegner, P. Fri . "The National Ignition Laser Performance Status". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393365.
@article{osti_1393365,
title = {The National Ignition Laser Performance Status},
author = {Di Nicola, J M and Bond, T and Bowers, M and Chang, L and Hermann, M and House, R and Manes, K and Mennerat, G and MacGowan, B and Negres, R and Nostrand, M and Olejniczak, B and Orth, C and Parham, T and Rana, S and Raymond, B and Shaw, M and Spaeth, M and Suratwala, T and Van Wonterghem, B and Williams, W and Widmayer, C and Yang, S and Wegner, P},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single ''quad'' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the Precision Diagnostics System (PDS). The PDS includes its ownmore » independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements.« less
  • The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF will provide 192 energetic laser beams that will compress small fusion targets to conditions where theymore » will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for very high power and extreme electromagnetic field research and applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible, along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to near-exawatt power levels.« less
  • The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a $2.25B stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Agency and when completed will be the world's largest laser system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of extreme energy densities and pressures. In NIF up to 192 energetic laser beams will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions.more » NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for high power applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to exawatt power levels.« less