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Title: Life cycle assessment of a commercial rainwater harvesting system compared with a municipal water supply system

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393266
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Cleaner Production
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 151; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-19 22:46:55; Journal ID: ISSN 0959-6526
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ghimire, Santosh R., Johnston, John M., Ingwersen, Wesley W., and Sojka, Sarah. Life cycle assessment of a commercial rainwater harvesting system compared with a municipal water supply system. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.025.
Ghimire, Santosh R., Johnston, John M., Ingwersen, Wesley W., & Sojka, Sarah. Life cycle assessment of a commercial rainwater harvesting system compared with a municipal water supply system. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.025.
Ghimire, Santosh R., Johnston, John M., Ingwersen, Wesley W., and Sojka, Sarah. Mon . "Life cycle assessment of a commercial rainwater harvesting system compared with a municipal water supply system". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.025.
@article{osti_1393266,
title = {Life cycle assessment of a commercial rainwater harvesting system compared with a municipal water supply system},
author = {Ghimire, Santosh R. and Johnston, John M. and Ingwersen, Wesley W. and Sojka, Sarah},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.025},
journal = {Journal of Cleaner Production},
number = C,
volume = 151,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.025

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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