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Title: Modelling the Mont Terri HE-D experiment for the Thermal–Hydraulic–Mechanical response of a bedded argillaceous formation to heating

Abstract

Coupled thermal–hydrological–mechanical (THM) processes in the near field of deep geological repositories can influence several safety features of the engineered and geological barriers. Among those features are: the possibility of damage in the host rock, the time for re-saturation of the bentonite, and the perturbations in the hydraulic regime in both the rock and engineered seals. Within the international cooperative code-validation project DECOVALEX-2015, eight research teams developed models to simulate an in situ heater experiment, called HE-D, in Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory in Switzerland. The models were developed from the theory of poroelasticity in order to simulate the coupled THM processes that prevailed during the experiment and thereby to characterize the in situ THM properties of Opalinus Clay. The modelling results for the evolution of temperature, pore water pressure, and deformation at different points are consistent among the research teams and compare favourably with the experimental data in terms of trends and absolute values. The models were able to reproduce the main physical processes of the experiment. In particular, most teams simulated temperature and thermally induced pore water pressure well, including spatial variations caused by inherent anisotropy due to bedding.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [7];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [9];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [11];  [11];  [12]
  1. NAGRA, Wettingen (Switzerland)
  2. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa (Canada)
  3. Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)
  4. Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, Brugg (Switzerland)
  5. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)
  6. Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Hokkaido (Japan)
  7. Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)
  8. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C. (United States)
  9. Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan (China)
  10. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  11. Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany)
  12. Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hanover (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1393231
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Earth Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1866-6280
Publisher:
Springer-Verlag
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Geological disposal; Argillacceous sedimentary rock; Coupled THM processes; Anisotropy

Citation Formats

Garitte, B., Nguyen, T. S., Barnichon, J. D., Graupner, B. J., Lee, C., Maekawa, K., Manepally, C., Ofoegbu, G., Dasgupta, B., Fedors, R., Pan, P. Z., Feng, X. T., Rutqvist, J., Chen, F., Birkholzer, Jens, Wang, Q., Kolditz, O., and Shao, H. Modelling the Mont Terri HE-D experiment for the Thermal–Hydraulic–Mechanical response of a bedded argillaceous formation to heating. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s12665-017-6662-1.
Garitte, B., Nguyen, T. S., Barnichon, J. D., Graupner, B. J., Lee, C., Maekawa, K., Manepally, C., Ofoegbu, G., Dasgupta, B., Fedors, R., Pan, P. Z., Feng, X. T., Rutqvist, J., Chen, F., Birkholzer, Jens, Wang, Q., Kolditz, O., & Shao, H. Modelling the Mont Terri HE-D experiment for the Thermal–Hydraulic–Mechanical response of a bedded argillaceous formation to heating. United States. doi:10.1007/s12665-017-6662-1.
Garitte, B., Nguyen, T. S., Barnichon, J. D., Graupner, B. J., Lee, C., Maekawa, K., Manepally, C., Ofoegbu, G., Dasgupta, B., Fedors, R., Pan, P. Z., Feng, X. T., Rutqvist, J., Chen, F., Birkholzer, Jens, Wang, Q., Kolditz, O., and Shao, H. Tue . "Modelling the Mont Terri HE-D experiment for the Thermal–Hydraulic–Mechanical response of a bedded argillaceous formation to heating". United States. doi:10.1007/s12665-017-6662-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393231.
@article{osti_1393231,
title = {Modelling the Mont Terri HE-D experiment for the Thermal–Hydraulic–Mechanical response of a bedded argillaceous formation to heating},
author = {Garitte, B. and Nguyen, T. S. and Barnichon, J. D. and Graupner, B. J. and Lee, C. and Maekawa, K. and Manepally, C. and Ofoegbu, G. and Dasgupta, B. and Fedors, R. and Pan, P. Z. and Feng, X. T. and Rutqvist, J. and Chen, F. and Birkholzer, Jens and Wang, Q. and Kolditz, O. and Shao, H.},
abstractNote = {Coupled thermal–hydrological–mechanical (THM) processes in the near field of deep geological repositories can influence several safety features of the engineered and geological barriers. Among those features are: the possibility of damage in the host rock, the time for re-saturation of the bentonite, and the perturbations in the hydraulic regime in both the rock and engineered seals. Within the international cooperative code-validation project DECOVALEX-2015, eight research teams developed models to simulate an in situ heater experiment, called HE-D, in Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory in Switzerland. The models were developed from the theory of poroelasticity in order to simulate the coupled THM processes that prevailed during the experiment and thereby to characterize the in situ THM properties of Opalinus Clay. The modelling results for the evolution of temperature, pore water pressure, and deformation at different points are consistent among the research teams and compare favourably with the experimental data in terms of trends and absolute values. The models were able to reproduce the main physical processes of the experiment. In particular, most teams simulated temperature and thermally induced pore water pressure well, including spatial variations caused by inherent anisotropy due to bedding.},
doi = {10.1007/s12665-017-6662-1},
journal = {Environmental Earth Sciences},
number = 9,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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