skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression

Abstract

In this study, dynamic fracture mechanisms of single and contacting spherical glass particles were observed using high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging. A modified Kolsky bar setup was used to apply controlled dynamic compressive loading on the soda-lime glass particles. Four different configurations of particle arrangements with one, two, three, and five particles were studied. In single particle experiments, cracking initiated near the contact area between the particle and the platen, subsequently fragmenting the particle in many small sub-particles. In multi-particle experiments, a crack was observed to initiate from the point just outside the contact area between two particles. The initiated crack propagated at an angle to the horizontal loading direction, resulting in separation of a fragment. However, this fragment separation did not affect the ability of the particle to withstand further contact loading. On further compression, large number of cracks initiated in the particle with the highest number of particle-particle contacts near one of the particle-particle contacts. The initiated cracks roughly followed the lines joining the contact points. Subsequently, the initiated cracks along with the newly developed sub-cracks bifurcated rapidly as they propagated through the particle and fractured the particle explosively into many small fragments, leaving the othermore » particles nearly intact.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science - Office of Basic Energy Sciences - Scientific User Facilities Division
OSTI Identifier:
1392968
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Impact Engineering; Journal Volume: 106
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
High speed X-ray phase contrast imaging; Kolsky bar; Particle fracture and fragmentation; dynamic fracture

Citation Formats

Parab, Niranjan D., Guo, Zherui, Hudspeth, Matthew C., Claus, Benjamin J., Fezzaa, Kamel, Sun, Tao, and Chen, Weinong W.. Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2017.03.021.
Parab, Niranjan D., Guo, Zherui, Hudspeth, Matthew C., Claus, Benjamin J., Fezzaa, Kamel, Sun, Tao, & Chen, Weinong W.. Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2017.03.021.
Parab, Niranjan D., Guo, Zherui, Hudspeth, Matthew C., Claus, Benjamin J., Fezzaa, Kamel, Sun, Tao, and Chen, Weinong W.. 2017. "Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2017.03.021.
@article{osti_1392968,
title = {Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression},
author = {Parab, Niranjan D. and Guo, Zherui and Hudspeth, Matthew C. and Claus, Benjamin J. and Fezzaa, Kamel and Sun, Tao and Chen, Weinong W.},
abstractNote = {In this study, dynamic fracture mechanisms of single and contacting spherical glass particles were observed using high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging. A modified Kolsky bar setup was used to apply controlled dynamic compressive loading on the soda-lime glass particles. Four different configurations of particle arrangements with one, two, three, and five particles were studied. In single particle experiments, cracking initiated near the contact area between the particle and the platen, subsequently fragmenting the particle in many small sub-particles. In multi-particle experiments, a crack was observed to initiate from the point just outside the contact area between two particles. The initiated crack propagated at an angle to the horizontal loading direction, resulting in separation of a fragment. However, this fragment separation did not affect the ability of the particle to withstand further contact loading. On further compression, large number of cracks initiated in the particle with the highest number of particle-particle contacts near one of the particle-particle contacts. The initiated cracks roughly followed the lines joining the contact points. Subsequently, the initiated cracks along with the newly developed sub-cracks bifurcated rapidly as they propagated through the particle and fractured the particle explosively into many small fragments, leaving the other particles nearly intact.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2017.03.021},
journal = {International Journal of Impact Engineering},
number = ,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}
  • Dynamic compression/shear experiments on a borosilicate glass at the average strain rate of 250s-1 are conducted using a modified version of Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB). Instead of applying confining pressure, cuboid specimens with the material axis inclining to the loading direction at different angles (0°, 3°, 5° and 7°) are used to generate higher shear stresses. A high-speed digital camera, synchronized with the loading stress pulse, is used to record the dynamic crack initiation and propagation. Experimental results show that the equivalent stress at failure decreases with increasing shear portion in the stress. Digital images show that the cracksmore » initiate randomly in the right specimen, whereas cracks initiate from the stress concentrated corners in the inclined specimens. Subsequent crack propagation, despite of specimen inclination angles, is along the specimen axis rather than the compressive loading direction.« less
  • In this paper, we study the impact-induced dynamic failure of a borosilicate glass block using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. Previous experimental studies on dynamic failure of borosilicate glass have been reported by Nie et al.1 using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The damage growth patterns and stress histories have been reported for various glass specimen designs. In this study, we propose to use a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model to describe the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-basedmore » damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used in quantifying the critical shear stress for the borosilicate glass under examination. It is shown that with only two modeling parameters, reasonably good comparisons between the predicted and the experimentally measured failure maps can be obtained for various glass sample geometries. Comparisons between the predicted stress histories for different sample designs are also used as model validations.« less