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Title: Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

Abstract

The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1392794
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-27965
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Shevitz, Daniel Wolf, Key, Brian P., and Garcia, Daniel B. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1392794.
Shevitz, Daniel Wolf, Key, Brian P., & Garcia, Daniel B. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT). United States. doi:10.2172/1392794.
Shevitz, Daniel Wolf, Key, Brian P., and Garcia, Daniel B. 2017. "Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)". United States. doi:10.2172/1392794. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1392794.
@article{osti_1392794,
title = {Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)},
author = {Shevitz, Daniel Wolf and Key, Brian P. and Garcia, Daniel B.},
abstractNote = {The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.},
doi = {10.2172/1392794},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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