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Title: Structural Basis for AMPK Activation: Natural and Synthetic Ligands Regulate Kinase Activity from Opposite Poles by Different Molecular Mechanisms

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1392741
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Structure
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-19 17:19:47; Journal ID: ISSN 0969-2126
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Calabrese, Matthew F., Rajamohan, Francis, Harris, Melissa S., Caspers, Nicole L., Magyar, Rachelle, Withka, Jane M., Wang, Hong, Borzilleri, Kris A., Sahasrabudhe, Parag V., Hoth, Lise R., Geoghegan, Kieran F., Han, Seungil, Brown, Janice, Subashi, Timothy A., Reyes, Allan R., Frisbie, Richard K., Ward, Jessica, Miller, Russell A., Landro, James A., Londregan, Allyn T., Carpino, Philip A., Cabral, Shawn, Smith, Aaron C., Conn, Edward L., Cameron, Kimberly O., Qiu, Xiayang, and Kurumbail, Ravi G.. Structural Basis for AMPK Activation: Natural and Synthetic Ligands Regulate Kinase Activity from Opposite Poles by Different Molecular Mechanisms. United Kingdom: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.str.2014.06.009.
Calabrese, Matthew F., Rajamohan, Francis, Harris, Melissa S., Caspers, Nicole L., Magyar, Rachelle, Withka, Jane M., Wang, Hong, Borzilleri, Kris A., Sahasrabudhe, Parag V., Hoth, Lise R., Geoghegan, Kieran F., Han, Seungil, Brown, Janice, Subashi, Timothy A., Reyes, Allan R., Frisbie, Richard K., Ward, Jessica, Miller, Russell A., Landro, James A., Londregan, Allyn T., Carpino, Philip A., Cabral, Shawn, Smith, Aaron C., Conn, Edward L., Cameron, Kimberly O., Qiu, Xiayang, & Kurumbail, Ravi G.. Structural Basis for AMPK Activation: Natural and Synthetic Ligands Regulate Kinase Activity from Opposite Poles by Different Molecular Mechanisms. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.str.2014.06.009.
Calabrese, Matthew F., Rajamohan, Francis, Harris, Melissa S., Caspers, Nicole L., Magyar, Rachelle, Withka, Jane M., Wang, Hong, Borzilleri, Kris A., Sahasrabudhe, Parag V., Hoth, Lise R., Geoghegan, Kieran F., Han, Seungil, Brown, Janice, Subashi, Timothy A., Reyes, Allan R., Frisbie, Richard K., Ward, Jessica, Miller, Russell A., Landro, James A., Londregan, Allyn T., Carpino, Philip A., Cabral, Shawn, Smith, Aaron C., Conn, Edward L., Cameron, Kimberly O., Qiu, Xiayang, and Kurumbail, Ravi G.. Fri . "Structural Basis for AMPK Activation: Natural and Synthetic Ligands Regulate Kinase Activity from Opposite Poles by Different Molecular Mechanisms". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.str.2014.06.009.
@article{osti_1392741,
title = {Structural Basis for AMPK Activation: Natural and Synthetic Ligands Regulate Kinase Activity from Opposite Poles by Different Molecular Mechanisms},
author = {Calabrese, Matthew F. and Rajamohan, Francis and Harris, Melissa S. and Caspers, Nicole L. and Magyar, Rachelle and Withka, Jane M. and Wang, Hong and Borzilleri, Kris A. and Sahasrabudhe, Parag V. and Hoth, Lise R. and Geoghegan, Kieran F. and Han, Seungil and Brown, Janice and Subashi, Timothy A. and Reyes, Allan R. and Frisbie, Richard K. and Ward, Jessica and Miller, Russell A. and Landro, James A. and Londregan, Allyn T. and Carpino, Philip A. and Cabral, Shawn and Smith, Aaron C. and Conn, Edward L. and Cameron, Kimberly O. and Qiu, Xiayang and Kurumbail, Ravi G.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.str.2014.06.009},
journal = {Structure},
number = 8,
volume = 22,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.str.2014.06.009

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 53works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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