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Title: Nonlinear terahertz metamaterials with active electrical control

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2]; ORCiD logo [4];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [2]
  1. School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA, Department of Physics, Washington College, Chestertown, Maryland 21620, USA
  2. School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA
  3. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, USA, Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260, USA
  4. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA
  5. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1392709
Grant/Contract Number:
NA-0003525; AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 12; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 22:10:22; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Keiser, G. R., Karl, N., Liu, P. Q., Tulloss, C., Chen, H. -T., Taylor, A. J., Brener, I., Reno, J. L., and Mittleman, D. M.. Nonlinear terahertz metamaterials with active electrical control. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4990671.
Keiser, G. R., Karl, N., Liu, P. Q., Tulloss, C., Chen, H. -T., Taylor, A. J., Brener, I., Reno, J. L., & Mittleman, D. M.. Nonlinear terahertz metamaterials with active electrical control. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4990671.
Keiser, G. R., Karl, N., Liu, P. Q., Tulloss, C., Chen, H. -T., Taylor, A. J., Brener, I., Reno, J. L., and Mittleman, D. M.. 2017. "Nonlinear terahertz metamaterials with active electrical control". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4990671.
@article{osti_1392709,
title = {Nonlinear terahertz metamaterials with active electrical control},
author = {Keiser, G. R. and Karl, N. and Liu, P. Q. and Tulloss, C. and Chen, H. -T. and Taylor, A. J. and Brener, I. and Reno, J. L. and Mittleman, D. M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4990671},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 12,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 19, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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