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Title: Sensitivity of vegetation indices and gross primary production of tallgrass prairie to severe drought

Abstract

Drought affects vegetation photosynthesis and growth.Many studies have used the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is calculated as the normalized ratio between near infrared and red spectral bands in satellite images, to evaluate the response of vegetation to drought. In this study, we examined the impacts of drought on three vegetation indices (NDVI, enhanced vegetation index, EVI, and land surface water index, LSWI) and CO2 flux from three tallgrass prairie eddy flux tower sites in the U.S. Gross primary production (GPP) was also modeled using a satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM), and the modeled GPP (GPPVPM) was compared with the GPP (GPPEC) derived from eddy covariance measurements. Precipitation at two sites in Oklahoma was 30% below the historical mean in both years of the study period (2005–2006), while the site in Illinois did not experience drought in the 2005–2007 study period. The EVI explained the seasonal dynamics of GPP better than did NDVI. The LSWI dropped below zero during severe droughts in the growing season, showing its potential to track drought. The result shows that GPP was more sensitive to drought than were vegetation indices, and EVI and LSWI were more sensitive than NDVI. We developed a modified functionmore » (Wscalar), calculated as a function of LSWI, to account for the effect of severe droughts on GPP in VPM. The GPPVPM from the modified VPM accounted for the rapid reduction in GPP during severe droughts and the seasonal dynamics of GPPVPM agreed reasonably well with GPPEC. Our analysis shows that 8-day averaged values (temperature, vapor-pressure deficit) do not reflect the short-term extreme climate events well, suggesting that satellite based models may need to be run at daily or hourly scales, especially under unfavorable climatic conditions.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1392588
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Remote Sensing of Environment; Journal Volume: 152; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Drought; Gross primary production; Light use efficiency; MODIS; Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM)

Citation Formats

Wagle, Pradeep, Xiao, Xiangming, Torn, Margaret S., Cook, David R., Matamala, Roser, Fischer, Marc L., Jin, Cui, Dong, Jinwei, and Biradar, Chandrashekhar. Sensitivity of vegetation indices and gross primary production of tallgrass prairie to severe drought. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.rse.2014.05.010.
Wagle, Pradeep, Xiao, Xiangming, Torn, Margaret S., Cook, David R., Matamala, Roser, Fischer, Marc L., Jin, Cui, Dong, Jinwei, & Biradar, Chandrashekhar. Sensitivity of vegetation indices and gross primary production of tallgrass prairie to severe drought. United States. doi:10.1016/j.rse.2014.05.010.
Wagle, Pradeep, Xiao, Xiangming, Torn, Margaret S., Cook, David R., Matamala, Roser, Fischer, Marc L., Jin, Cui, Dong, Jinwei, and Biradar, Chandrashekhar. Mon . "Sensitivity of vegetation indices and gross primary production of tallgrass prairie to severe drought". United States. doi:10.1016/j.rse.2014.05.010.
@article{osti_1392588,
title = {Sensitivity of vegetation indices and gross primary production of tallgrass prairie to severe drought},
author = {Wagle, Pradeep and Xiao, Xiangming and Torn, Margaret S. and Cook, David R. and Matamala, Roser and Fischer, Marc L. and Jin, Cui and Dong, Jinwei and Biradar, Chandrashekhar},
abstractNote = {Drought affects vegetation photosynthesis and growth.Many studies have used the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is calculated as the normalized ratio between near infrared and red spectral bands in satellite images, to evaluate the response of vegetation to drought. In this study, we examined the impacts of drought on three vegetation indices (NDVI, enhanced vegetation index, EVI, and land surface water index, LSWI) and CO2 flux from three tallgrass prairie eddy flux tower sites in the U.S. Gross primary production (GPP) was also modeled using a satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM), and the modeled GPP (GPPVPM) was compared with the GPP (GPPEC) derived from eddy covariance measurements. Precipitation at two sites in Oklahoma was 30% below the historical mean in both years of the study period (2005–2006), while the site in Illinois did not experience drought in the 2005–2007 study period. The EVI explained the seasonal dynamics of GPP better than did NDVI. The LSWI dropped below zero during severe droughts in the growing season, showing its potential to track drought. The result shows that GPP was more sensitive to drought than were vegetation indices, and EVI and LSWI were more sensitive than NDVI. We developed a modified function (Wscalar), calculated as a function of LSWI, to account for the effect of severe droughts on GPP in VPM. The GPPVPM from the modified VPM accounted for the rapid reduction in GPP during severe droughts and the seasonal dynamics of GPPVPM agreed reasonably well with GPPEC. Our analysis shows that 8-day averaged values (temperature, vapor-pressure deficit) do not reflect the short-term extreme climate events well, suggesting that satellite based models may need to be run at daily or hourly scales, especially under unfavorable climatic conditions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.rse.2014.05.010},
journal = {Remote Sensing of Environment},
number = C,
volume = 152,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}