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Title: Energy Innovation Clusters and their Influence on Manufacturing: A Case Study Perspective

Abstract

Innovation clusters have been important for recent development of clean energy technologies and their emergence as mature, globally competitive industries. However, the factors that influence the co-location of manufacturing activities with innovation clusters are less clear. A central question for government agencies seeking to grow manufacturing as part of economic development in their location is how innovation clusters influence manufacturing. Thus, this paper examines case studies of innovation clusters for three different clean energy technologies that have developed in at least two locations: solar PV clusters in California and the province of Jiangsu in China, wind turbine clusters in Germany and the U.S. Great Lakes region, and ethanol clusters in the U.S. Midwest and the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil. These case studies provide initial insight into factors and conditions that contribute to technology manufacturing facility location decisions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. National Science Foundation (NSF), Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Advanced Manufacturing Office (EE-5A)
OSTI Identifier:
1392202
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A50-68146
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; clean energy technologies; manufacturing; innovation clusters; location; case studies; solar; wind; ethanol clusters

Citation Formats

Engel-Cox, Jill, and Hill, Derek. Energy Innovation Clusters and their Influence on Manufacturing: A Case Study Perspective. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1392202.
Engel-Cox, Jill, & Hill, Derek. Energy Innovation Clusters and their Influence on Manufacturing: A Case Study Perspective. United States. doi:10.2172/1392202.
Engel-Cox, Jill, and Hill, Derek. 2017. "Energy Innovation Clusters and their Influence on Manufacturing: A Case Study Perspective". United States. doi:10.2172/1392202. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1392202.
@article{osti_1392202,
title = {Energy Innovation Clusters and their Influence on Manufacturing: A Case Study Perspective},
author = {Engel-Cox, Jill and Hill, Derek},
abstractNote = {Innovation clusters have been important for recent development of clean energy technologies and their emergence as mature, globally competitive industries. However, the factors that influence the co-location of manufacturing activities with innovation clusters are less clear. A central question for government agencies seeking to grow manufacturing as part of economic development in their location is how innovation clusters influence manufacturing. Thus, this paper examines case studies of innovation clusters for three different clean energy technologies that have developed in at least two locations: solar PV clusters in California and the province of Jiangsu in China, wind turbine clusters in Germany and the U.S. Great Lakes region, and ethanol clusters in the U.S. Midwest and the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil. These case studies provide initial insight into factors and conditions that contribute to technology manufacturing facility location decisions.},
doi = {10.2172/1392202},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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