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Title: A radially accessible tubular in situ X-ray cell for spatially resolved operando scattering and spectroscopic studies of electrochemical energy storage devices

Abstract

A tubularoperandoelectrochemical cell has been developed to allow spatially resolved X-ray scattering and spectroscopic measurements of individual cell components, or regions thereof, during device operation. These measurements are enabled by the tubular cell geometry, wherein the X-ray-transparent tube walls allow radial access for the incident and scattered/transmitted X-ray beam; by probing different depths within the electrode stack, the transformation of different components or regions can be resolved. The cell is compatible with a variety of synchrotron-based scattering, absorption and imaging methodologies. The reliability of the electrochemical cell and the quality of the resulting X-ray scattering and spectroscopic data are demonstrated for two types of energy storage: the evolution of the distribution of the state of charge of an Li-ion battery electrode during cycling is documented using X-ray powder diffraction, and the redistribution of ions between two porous carbon electrodes in an electrochemical double-layer capacitor is documented using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science - Energy Frontier Research Center - NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES); University of Cambridge; USDOE Office of Science - Office of Basic Energy Sciences - Scientific User Facilities Division
OSTI Identifier:
1391936
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online); Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
In-situ X-ray electrochemical cell; batteries; capacitor; energy storage; spatial resolution

Citation Formats

Liu, Hao, Allan, Phoebe K., Borkiewicz, Olaf J., Kurtz, Charles, Grey, Clare P., Chapman, Karena W., and Chupas, Peter J. A radially accessible tubular in situ X-ray cell for spatially resolved operando scattering and spectroscopic studies of electrochemical energy storage devices. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1107/S1600576716012632.
Liu, Hao, Allan, Phoebe K., Borkiewicz, Olaf J., Kurtz, Charles, Grey, Clare P., Chapman, Karena W., & Chupas, Peter J. A radially accessible tubular in situ X-ray cell for spatially resolved operando scattering and spectroscopic studies of electrochemical energy storage devices. United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576716012632.
Liu, Hao, Allan, Phoebe K., Borkiewicz, Olaf J., Kurtz, Charles, Grey, Clare P., Chapman, Karena W., and Chupas, Peter J. 2016. "A radially accessible tubular in situ X-ray cell for spatially resolved operando scattering and spectroscopic studies of electrochemical energy storage devices". United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576716012632.
@article{osti_1391936,
title = {A radially accessible tubular in situ X-ray cell for spatially resolved operando scattering and spectroscopic studies of electrochemical energy storage devices},
author = {Liu, Hao and Allan, Phoebe K. and Borkiewicz, Olaf J. and Kurtz, Charles and Grey, Clare P. and Chapman, Karena W. and Chupas, Peter J.},
abstractNote = {A tubularoperandoelectrochemical cell has been developed to allow spatially resolved X-ray scattering and spectroscopic measurements of individual cell components, or regions thereof, during device operation. These measurements are enabled by the tubular cell geometry, wherein the X-ray-transparent tube walls allow radial access for the incident and scattered/transmitted X-ray beam; by probing different depths within the electrode stack, the transformation of different components or regions can be resolved. The cell is compatible with a variety of synchrotron-based scattering, absorption and imaging methodologies. The reliability of the electrochemical cell and the quality of the resulting X-ray scattering and spectroscopic data are demonstrated for two types of energy storage: the evolution of the distribution of the state of charge of an Li-ion battery electrode during cycling is documented using X-ray powder diffraction, and the redistribution of ions between two porous carbon electrodes in an electrochemical double-layer capacitor is documented using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.},
doi = {10.1107/S1600576716012632},
journal = {Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online)},
number = 5,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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