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Title: High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials

Abstract

Abstract

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy; USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1391874
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Materials Research; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 09
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; radiation effects; steel; x-ray diffraction (XRD)

Citation Formats

Park, Jun-Sang, Zhang, Xuan, Sharma, Hemant, Kenesei, Peter, Hoelzer, David, Li, Meimei, and Almer, Jonathan. High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1557/jmr.2015.50.
Park, Jun-Sang, Zhang, Xuan, Sharma, Hemant, Kenesei, Peter, Hoelzer, David, Li, Meimei, & Almer, Jonathan. High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials. United States. doi:10.1557/jmr.2015.50.
Park, Jun-Sang, Zhang, Xuan, Sharma, Hemant, Kenesei, Peter, Hoelzer, David, Li, Meimei, and Almer, Jonathan. Fri . "High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials". United States. doi:10.1557/jmr.2015.50.
@article{osti_1391874,
title = {High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials},
author = {Park, Jun-Sang and Zhang, Xuan and Sharma, Hemant and Kenesei, Peter and Hoelzer, David and Li, Meimei and Almer, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {Abstract},
doi = {10.1557/jmr.2015.50},
journal = {Journal of Materials Research},
number = 09,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Fri Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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