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Title: Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations

Abstract

Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO) with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ~10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (~10-3 s) observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser’s focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicatingmore » that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, CA 93111, USA
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Nevada Test Site/National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Programs (DP) (NA-10)
OSTI Identifier:
1391785
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/25946-3186
Journal ID: ISSN 2158-3226
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC52-06NA25946
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 2158-3226
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; plasma, laser ablation, high explosive, laser-induced plasma

Citation Formats

Kimblin, Clare, Trainham, Rusty, Capelle, Gene A., Mao, Xianglei, and Russo, Richard E. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4999793.
Kimblin, Clare, Trainham, Rusty, Capelle, Gene A., Mao, Xianglei, & Russo, Richard E. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4999793.
Kimblin, Clare, Trainham, Rusty, Capelle, Gene A., Mao, Xianglei, and Russo, Richard E. Fri . "Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4999793.
@article{osti_1391785,
title = {Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations},
author = {Kimblin, Clare and Trainham, Rusty and Capelle, Gene A. and Mao, Xianglei and Russo, Richard E.},
abstractNote = {Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO) with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ~10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (~10-3 s) observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser’s focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicating that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4999793},
journal = {AIP Advances},
issn = {2158-3226},
number = 9,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}