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Title: Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications

Abstract

Thin (<50 µm) and flawless diamond single crystals are essential for the realization of numerous advanced X-ray optical devices at synchrotron radiation and free-electron laser facilities. The fabrication and handling of such ultra-thin components without introducing crystal damage and strain is a challenge. Drumhead crystals, monolithic crystal structures composed of a thin membrane furnished with a surrounding solid collar, are a solution ensuring mechanically stable strain-free mounting of the membranes with efficient thermal transport. Diamond, being one of the hardest and most chemically inert materials, poses significant difficulties in fabrication. Reported here is the successful manufacture of diamond drumhead crystals in the [100] orientation using picosecond laser milling. Subsequent high-temperature treatment appears to be crucial for the membranes to become defect free and unstrained, as revealed by X-ray topography on examples of drumhead crystals with a 26 µm thick (1 mm in diameter) and a 47 µm thick (1.5 × 2.5 mm) membrane.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Argonne National Laboratory - Advanced Photon Source; USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1391675
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online); Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kolodziej, Tomasz, Vodnala, Preeti, Terentyev, Sergey, Blank, Vladimir, and Shvyd'ko, Yuri. Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1107/S1600576716009171.
Kolodziej, Tomasz, Vodnala, Preeti, Terentyev, Sergey, Blank, Vladimir, & Shvyd'ko, Yuri. Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications. United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576716009171.
Kolodziej, Tomasz, Vodnala, Preeti, Terentyev, Sergey, Blank, Vladimir, and Shvyd'ko, Yuri. 2016. "Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications". United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576716009171.
@article{osti_1391675,
title = {Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications},
author = {Kolodziej, Tomasz and Vodnala, Preeti and Terentyev, Sergey and Blank, Vladimir and Shvyd'ko, Yuri},
abstractNote = {Thin (<50 µm) and flawless diamond single crystals are essential for the realization of numerous advanced X-ray optical devices at synchrotron radiation and free-electron laser facilities. The fabrication and handling of such ultra-thin components without introducing crystal damage and strain is a challenge. Drumhead crystals, monolithic crystal structures composed of a thin membrane furnished with a surrounding solid collar, are a solution ensuring mechanically stable strain-free mounting of the membranes with efficient thermal transport. Diamond, being one of the hardest and most chemically inert materials, poses significant difficulties in fabrication. Reported here is the successful manufacture of diamond drumhead crystals in the [100] orientation using picosecond laser milling. Subsequent high-temperature treatment appears to be crucial for the membranes to become defect free and unstrained, as revealed by X-ray topography on examples of drumhead crystals with a 26 µm thick (1 mm in diameter) and a 47 µm thick (1.5 × 2.5 mm) membrane.},
doi = {10.1107/S1600576716009171},
journal = {Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online)},
number = 4,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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