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Title: Dehydration-driven stress transfer triggers intermediate-depth earthquakes

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
FOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1390885
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 05
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Ferrand, Thomas P., Hilairet, Nadège, Incel, Sarah, Deldicque, Damien, Labrousse, Loïc, Gasc, Julien, Renner, Joerg, Wang, Yanbin, Green II, Harry W., and Schubnel, Alexandre. Dehydration-driven stress transfer triggers intermediate-depth earthquakes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms15247.
Ferrand, Thomas P., Hilairet, Nadège, Incel, Sarah, Deldicque, Damien, Labrousse, Loïc, Gasc, Julien, Renner, Joerg, Wang, Yanbin, Green II, Harry W., & Schubnel, Alexandre. Dehydration-driven stress transfer triggers intermediate-depth earthquakes. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15247.
Ferrand, Thomas P., Hilairet, Nadège, Incel, Sarah, Deldicque, Damien, Labrousse, Loïc, Gasc, Julien, Renner, Joerg, Wang, Yanbin, Green II, Harry W., and Schubnel, Alexandre. Mon . "Dehydration-driven stress transfer triggers intermediate-depth earthquakes". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15247.
@article{osti_1390885,
title = {Dehydration-driven stress transfer triggers intermediate-depth earthquakes},
author = {Ferrand, Thomas P. and Hilairet, Nadège and Incel, Sarah and Deldicque, Damien and Labrousse, Loïc and Gasc, Julien and Renner, Joerg and Wang, Yanbin and Green II, Harry W. and Schubnel, Alexandre},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms15247},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 05,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Intermediate-depth earthquakes (30–300 km) have been extensively documented within subducting oceanic slabs, but their mechanics remains enigmatic. Here in this paper we decipher the mechanism of these earthquakes by performing deformation experiments on dehydrating serpentinized peridotites (synthetic antigorite-olivine aggregates, minerals representative of subduction zones lithologies) at upper mantle conditions. At a pressure of 1.1 gigapascals, dehydration of deforming samples containing only 5 vol% of antigorite suffices to trigger acoustic emissions, a laboratory-scale analogue of earthquakes. At 3.5 gigapascals, acoustic emissions are recorded from samples with up to 50 vol% of antigorite. Experimentally produced faults, observed post-mortem, are sealed by fluid-bearingmore » micro-pseudotachylytes. Microstructural observations demonstrate that antigorite dehydration triggered dynamic shear failure of the olivine load-bearing network. These laboratory analogues of intermediatedepth earthquakes demonstrate that little dehydration is required to trigger embrittlement. We propose an alternative model to dehydration-embrittlement in which dehydration-driven stress transfer, rather than fluid overpressure, causes embrittlement.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The geophysical arguments relevant to the depth extent of mantle convection are reviewed with special attention to the seismic properties of subducted lithosphere. New focal mechanism solutions of deep and intermediate earthquakes from the Tonga-Kermadec region are presented, but it is then shown that these do not provide an unambiguous constraint regarding the ability of subducted material to penetrate below 700 km. Estimates of the seismic energy release as a function of depth in Tonga show very large energy release in the depth range 500--700 km, which is just above the depth at which all seismicity ends. This property ofmore » the seismicity proves to be the most suggestive of the inability of subducted meterial to penetrate below 700-km depth.« less
  • Very high frequencies (5--10 Hz) are recorded at Garm, Tadzhikistan (..delta..approx.200 km), near Toktogul, Kirgizia (..delta..approx.600 km) and at other close stations from intermediate depth earthquakes in the Pamir-Hindu Kush region. The seismic phase, S/sub n/, is recorded with large amplitudes and high frequencies at stations in Pakistan and India from intermediate depth earthquakes. Such high frequencies require either extremely high average values of Q (several thousand) or very high stress drops of earthquakes (kilobars) or possibly both. Regardless of the stress drops, we infer that Qapproximately-greater-than1000 along paths through a portion of the mantle where Q is usually low.more » Thus these data indicate a discontinuity, or marked thinning, of the asthenosphere. Even if Q were infinite, the spectral content of the signals at Garm, in addition, could also be interpreted as evidence for relatively high stress drops for the intermediate depth earthquakes. If Q is equal to 3000, the highest calculated stress drops are for events with depths between about 50 and 180 km and range from several tens to several hundred bars.« less
  • Simple models of earthquake faults are important for understanding the mechanisms for their observed behavior, such as Gutenberg-Richter scaling and the relation between large and small events, which is the basis for various forecasting methods. Although cellular automaton models have been studied extensively in the long-range stress transfer limit, this limit has not been studied for the Burridge-Knopoff model, which includes more realistic friction forces and inertia. We find that the latter model with long-range stress transfer exhibits qualitatively different behavior than both the long-range cellular automaton models and the usual Burridge-Knopoff model with nearest-neighbor springs, depending on the naturemore » of the velocity-weakening friction force. These results have important implications for our understanding of earthquakes and other driven dissipative systems.« less