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Title: U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017

Abstract

NREL has been modeling U.S. photovoltaic (PV) system costs since 2009. This year, our report benchmarks costs of U.S. solar PV for residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems built in the first quarter of 2017 (Q1 2017). Costs are represented from the perspective of the developer/installer, thus all hardware costs represent the price at which components are purchased by the developer/installer, not accounting for preexisting supply agreements or other contracts. Importantly, the benchmark this year (2017) also represents the sales price paid to the installer; therefore, it includes profit in the cost of the hardware, along with the profit the installer/developer receives, as a separate cost category. However, it does not include any additional net profit, such as a developer fee or price gross-up, which are common in the marketplace. We adopt this approach owing to the wide variation in developer profits in all three sectors, where project pricing is highly dependent on region and project specifics such as local retail electricity rate structures, local rebate and incentive structures, competitive environment, and overall project or deal structures.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1390776
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-68925
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar PV cost; photovoltaics; capital cost; LCOE; bottom up cost model

Citation Formats

Fu, Ran, Feldman, David J., Margolis, Robert M., Woodhouse, Michael A., and Ardani, Kristen B. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1390776.
Fu, Ran, Feldman, David J., Margolis, Robert M., Woodhouse, Michael A., & Ardani, Kristen B. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017. United States. doi:10.2172/1390776.
Fu, Ran, Feldman, David J., Margolis, Robert M., Woodhouse, Michael A., and Ardani, Kristen B. Mon . "U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017". United States. doi:10.2172/1390776. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1390776.
@article{osti_1390776,
title = {U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017},
author = {Fu, Ran and Feldman, David J. and Margolis, Robert M. and Woodhouse, Michael A. and Ardani, Kristen B.},
abstractNote = {NREL has been modeling U.S. photovoltaic (PV) system costs since 2009. This year, our report benchmarks costs of U.S. solar PV for residential, commercial, and utility-scale systems built in the first quarter of 2017 (Q1 2017). Costs are represented from the perspective of the developer/installer, thus all hardware costs represent the price at which components are purchased by the developer/installer, not accounting for preexisting supply agreements or other contracts. Importantly, the benchmark this year (2017) also represents the sales price paid to the installer; therefore, it includes profit in the cost of the hardware, along with the profit the installer/developer receives, as a separate cost category. However, it does not include any additional net profit, such as a developer fee or price gross-up, which are common in the marketplace. We adopt this approach owing to the wide variation in developer profits in all three sectors, where project pricing is highly dependent on region and project specifics such as local retail electricity rate structures, local rebate and incentive structures, competitive environment, and overall project or deal structures.},
doi = {10.2172/1390776},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Sep 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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