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Title: SESAME and beyond

Abstract

Last week, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, the Palestinian Authority, and Turkey, as well as other nations and international organizations, gathered in Jordan to inaugurate the Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) project. Having persevered through two decades of political and financial challenges, this complex machine is poised to run its first experiments this year. Indeed, SESAME represents the power of science in bringing together countries—even those with frayed relations—under a common goal of advancing knowledge for the benefit of all humankind. The triumph of SESAME, and the outpouring of research results from other light sources around the world, have spurred interest in building synchrotrons in developing countries.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Triangle Science, Education, & Economic Development, LLC, Hillsborough, NC (United States)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390712
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 356; Journal Issue: 6340; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Mtingwa, Sekazi K., and Winick, Herman. SESAME and beyond. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aan6880.
Mtingwa, Sekazi K., & Winick, Herman. SESAME and beyond. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aan6880.
Mtingwa, Sekazi K., and Winick, Herman. 2017. "SESAME and beyond". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aan6880.
@article{osti_1390712,
title = {SESAME and beyond},
author = {Mtingwa, Sekazi K. and Winick, Herman},
abstractNote = {Last week, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, the Palestinian Authority, and Turkey, as well as other nations and international organizations, gathered in Jordan to inaugurate the Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) project. Having persevered through two decades of political and financial challenges, this complex machine is poised to run its first experiments this year. Indeed, SESAME represents the power of science in bringing together countries—even those with frayed relations—under a common goal of advancing knowledge for the benefit of all humankind. The triumph of SESAME, and the outpouring of research results from other light sources around the world, have spurred interest in building synchrotrons in developing countries.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aan6880},
journal = {Science},
number = 6340,
volume = 356,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 26, 2018
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  • Sesame paste contains a relatively high concentration of lead approximately 2.2 ppm. Sesame paste was stored in unlacquered cans and high density polyethylene jars, and sesame seeds of different origins were purchased from the same factory and sampled at random. Some of the cans, each containing 100 g paste, were stored at 35/sup 0/C for 2 months to determine evidence of accelerated corrosion and/or migration of the lead from the solder in the side seams of the cans. However, there was no increase in the initial level for any of the samples. The high concentration is not due to migrationmore » of the metal present in the packaging material, but rather to an original high content in the oilseeds, as found in samples from three countries. This conclusion is particularly crucial for certain populations in the Orient and Africa for whom sesame paste is a staple food. The maximum acceptable load of lead from food set by FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives is 0.005 mg/kg body weight per day. Thus, the consumption limit of foods containing more than 2 ppm of lead is below 175 g/day for an adult weighing 70 kg. Lead contamination of crops can be caused by aerial fallout from pesticide, industrial, or automotive sources of lead.« less
  • A simple fuel performance code, SESAME, has been developed to analyze the steady-state irradiation behavior of metallic fuels. Important characteristics of metallic fuels such as fission product gas release, swelling, material redistribution, bonding sodium infiltration, and axial elongation are studied. Simple models have been developed for the SESAME code, which are successful in predicting irradiation data and useful in investigating the basic mechanisms that contribute to these particular irradiation behaviors of metallic fuels.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Morphological changes and the characteristics of mutants induced by radiation in sesame plants are described. (C.H.)